The End of the Southern Kingdom – 2 Chronicles 36

Jehoiachin-Jeconiah was a king of Judah. He wa...

Jehoiachin-Jeconiah was a king of Judah. He was the son of Jehoiakim with Nehushta, the daughter of Elnathan of Jerusalem. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Josiah’s son, Jehoahaz, reigned next at the age of 23. His reign lasted for three months, when “the king of Egypt deposed him in Jerusalem and laid on the land a tribute of a hundred talents of silver and a talent of gold.” Neco then made his brother, Eliakim, king and changed his name to Jehoiakim. Then he carried Jehoahaz off to Egypt.

Jehoiakim was 25 years old when he began his reign, and he reigned eleven years. The scripture simply says that he did evil in the sight of the Lord. Whatever that means, you can be sure that idolatry was involved somewhere. Then Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, bound him in chains and took him to Babylon. he also took some vessels from the house of the Lord, and brought them to his palace.

Then Jehoiachin, Jehoiakim’s son, began his reign, which lasted just over three months. Then Nebuchadnezzar also sent for him, and brought him to Babylon, making his brother, Zedekiah, king. He was twenty-one when he began his reign, and he also reigned for eleven years. He also did evil in God’s eyes.  It was a ruinous time. Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, and he turned away from God, so there was no help for him. Next comes the capture and burning of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans.

The Books of Chronicles ends with the Proclamation of Cyrus, in which he says that God has charged him with building a house in Jerusalem. Thus ends the Book of Chronicles, which was written to give the remnant of the southern kingdom, who had returned from captivity, hope for the future and an understanding of the past. It shows that the line of David remained intact and kept the necessary records of their heritage and lineages, so that God’s people could begin to rebuild the land, the temple, and their lives.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Josiah Reign Ends – 2 Chronicles 35

Chapter 35 is somewhat puzzling because we do not have all of the answers we might wish to have about it. It begins with Josiah keeping the Passover. And this time it was done so that the scripture says that there had not been one like it since the days of Samuel. But then Pharaoh Neco came up from Egypt to fight at Carchemish on the Euphrates. Josiah went out to meet him, but Neco sent envoys to meet him, telling him that he had no quarrel with him.  He told Josiah that he had been sent by God to hurry, and that if he interfered, he would be destroyed.

But Josiah didn’t listen, and he disguised himself and went in to fight. He was shot by Neco’s archers. Badly wounded, he was carried out by chariot to Jerusalem, where he died. And so ends the reign of one of the best kings Judah had seen. Why was Neco sent by God? A mystery we cannot know.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

 

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good King Josiah – 2 Chronicles 34

English: Josias-Josiah was a king of Judah (64...

English: Josias-Josiah was a king of Judah (641–609 BC) who instituted major reforms. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Josiah began his reign at the age of eight. By the time he was twelve he had begun his purge of Judah and Jerusalem. He tore down the high places, the Asherim,, and the carved images. He chopped down the altars of the Baals. After breaking down the Asherim and the carved images into powder, he scattered the dust over the graves of those who had served them. Verse 5 says that “he also burned the bones of the priests on their altars and cleansed Judah and Jerusalem.”

He sent officials into the house of the Lord to repair it, and they found that the Levites had still been collecting money from the people. They used it to pay builders and carpenters in the effort. Then Hilkiah the priest found the Book of the Law of the Lord. It was brought to the king, and when he read it, he tore his clothes. Having discovered what the Law said, he told Hilkiah and those with him to inquire of the Lord concerning the Law. He knew that God’s wrath was upon them because of the evil their fathers had done.

Hilkiah went to Huldah the prophetess, who prophesied disaster for the people. But God told Josiah that because he had humbled himself, he would go to his grave in peace, without seeing the destruction to come. Josiah had the Law read to the people and he made a covenant with the Lord and brought the people into it. They served God all the days of Josiah’s life.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

The Miserable Reign of Manasseh – 2 Chronicles 33

Manasseh was twelve years old when he became king after the death of his father, Hezekiah. As good as his father was for Judah, Manasseh was evil in kind. He rebuilt all the high places that his father destroyed, and he erected altars for worship of the Baals, and made Asheroth. He even burned his own sons as an offering in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom. Recall that practices such as these were the very reason that God gave the Canaanites over to the Israelites in the first place. He also used fortune-telling and omens and sorcery, and dealt with mediums and with necromancers. The kingdom had sunk to its lowest point, it seemed. The wrath of God burned hot. To make matters worse, he set a carved image of an idol in the house of the Lord.

Then God sent the Assyrians, and they captured him with hooks and bound him with chains, taking him to Babylon. Then incredibly, Manasseh had a change of heart and repented in prayer to God. God was moved by his pleas and restored him to Jerusalem. After this, he built an outer wall for the city, and he took away all of the idols, including the one he had placed in the house of the Lord. He tore down the altars and threw them all outside the city. Then he commanded the people to worship God. But they still sacrificed at the high places, but only to God.

It is worth noting that if God can forgive evil as Manasseh had done, he will forgive anyone with a repentant heart.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Hezekiah and Sennacherib – 2 Chronicles 31-32

The Taylor Prism from the Neo-Assyrian empire ...

The Taylor Prism from the Neo-Assyrian empire tells the story of king Sennacherib’s third campaign and includes descriptions of his conquests in Judah, some of which are described from another point of view in the old testament of the Bible. This picture has been assembled from File:Taylor Prism-1.jpg and File:Taylor Prism-2.jpg. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After the temple was restored, the people of Israel went out into the cities of Judah and tore down the Asherim and the high places throughout Judah, Benjamin, Ephraim , and Manasseh. Then they returned to their own cities. Hezekiah then had the priests and Levites divided up according to their service. He made his own contribution for the offerings; and then he had the people resume the practice of tithing and bringing their firstfruits for the priests and the Levites. Because God had blessed the people richly, the contributions were so plentiful, that there was a great abundance over what was needed. Because of Hezekiah’s leadership,  the people prospered greatly.

In chapter 32, Sennacherib of Assyria came and invaded Judah. And Hezekiah had the people go to all of the springs and the brook that ran through the area and stopped the water from flowing — thereby depriving Sennacherib‘s army the benefit of the water. He then had the walls rebuilt and towers erected upon them; and he had them make weapons and shields. He spoke encouragingly to the people and told them the same thing that Moses and Joshua had told the people so long ago — “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or dismayed before the king of Assyria and all the horde that is with him.” He assured them that God was with them, and the people were comforted.

Sennacherib sent servants and wrote letters to mock God, trying to discourage and dismay the people. Then God sent an angel, who struck down his forces. Sennacherib returned to his land defeated, and was killed by his own sons. Hezekiah became very sick, and he prayed to God and was delivered from death. But his heart grew proud and he brought wrath upon the people until he humbled himself. Hezekiah and the people prospered greatly until his death. And then his son Manasseh reigned.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Hezekiah Reigns as King – 2 Chronicles 29-30

Ezechias-Hezekiah was the son of Ahaz and the ...

Ezechias-Hezekiah was the son of Ahaz and the 14th king of Judah. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After the death of Ahaz, his son Hezekiah began his reign at the age of 25. Here was a breath of fresh air as far as kings go in the southern kingdom. After the miserable reign of his father, the temple was in poor shape. Hezekiah set about getting the temple cleansed, and he called the Levites together and charged them with consecrating themselves, cleansing the temple, and restoring worship in the temple. They completed the task, and the people celebrated and rejoiced with thank offerings. Notice in verse 17, it took 16 days to cleanse and consecrate the temple. Ahaz had caused all of this.

Hezekiah wrote letters and sent couriers throughout Israel and Judah telling the people to consecrate themselves and come to celebrate the Passover. Some of them laughed and mocked, but many did come. Some did not consecrate themselves, however. Hezekiah prayed on their behalf, saying “May the good Lord pardon everyone who sets his heart to seek God, the Lord, the God of his fathers, even though not according to the sanctuary’s rules of cleanness.” Verse 26 says that God heard him and that He healed the people. The festivities were good for the people and it was a great time of spiritual awakening. Verse 23 says that the whole assembly agreed to keep the feast an extra seven days.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Jotham and Ahaz – 2 Chronicles 27-28

English: Ahaz was king of Judah, and the son a...

English: Ahaz was king of Judah, and the son and successor of Jotham. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Uzziah died, his son Jotham became king at the age of 25. His mother was from the line of Zadok – a priest during David’s reign. He is said in the scriptures to have done right in God’s eyes. He built cities and forts, and he fought successfully against the Ammonites. After his victory, they paid yearly tribute to him, which increased his might and the wealth of the kingdom. His reign lasted 16 years until his death.

His son, Ahaz became king next. His reign also lasted 16 years, but it was a terrible 16 years. Ahaz was one of the most wicked and corrupt of the kings of the southern kingdom. He made idols of the Baals for worship, and even burned his own sons as an offering. God gave him up first to the Syrians and then to the king of Israel. But he did not learn his lesson. He began worship of the gods of Syria, thinking he would enjoy their success as a result. As things continued to get worse (including having thousands killed and thousands more taken captive) he sent for help from the Assyrians, and even paid them tribute. But instead, the Assyrians came against them as well.

His blasphemy and idolatry continued still until his death. He “cut in pieces the vessels of the house of God, and he shut up the doors of the house of the Lord, and he made himself altars in every corner of Jerusalem.” His reign was certainly one of the most miserable of times for God’s people.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Uzziah Becomes King of Judah – 2 Chronicles 26

English: Ozias(Uzziah), King of Judah (809-759...

English: Ozias(Uzziah), King of Judah (809-759 B. C.) son and successor of Amazias. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Amaziah’s death, the people took his son, Uzziah, as king at the age of 16 years. He did battle with the Philistines, and verse 6 says that he “broke through the wall of Gath and the wall of Jabneh and the wall of Ashdod, and he built cities in the territory of Ashdod and elsewhere among the Philistines.” He walked with God, and God was with him in his battles against the Philistines, the Arabians, and the Meunites. The Ammonites, seeing all this, paid him tribute to keep from being defeated themselves.

Uzziah built cities in the territory of Ashdod and “elsewhere among the Philistines.” He also built towers in the wilderness, and in Jerusalem at the Corner Gate and elsewhere (verse 9).  His army grew strong and he armed and prepared them well. His fame spread far and wide because God was with him until he became strong.

But in becoming strong, he became proud, and this was his downfall. He entered the temple where he was not supposed to be and wanted to light the incense there. The Law of Moses forbade him to be where he had gone, but his pride and his exposure to the privileges of kings of other nations brought about his destruction. he became angry when Azariah, the chief priest, confronted him and told him what evil it was for him to be doing this. Uzziah was struck with leprosy there, and he remained a leper until he died.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Amaziah’s Rise and Fall – 2 Chronicles 25

English: Amasias was the king of Judah, the so...

English: Amasias was the king of Judah, the son and successor of Joash. Русский: Амасия — царь Иудеи (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Joash was executed, his son Amaziah took over as king at the age of 25. Once in power, he avenged his father’s death by executing his servants who had participated. The text says that he did not kill their children, citing Deuteronomy 24:16. he assembled a large army and then recruited warriors from Israel, paying them in advance. But a prophet came and told him not to kllet them fight with his men because God was not with the Israelites. So he sent them home, and they were angry because of it.

 Amaziah took his men from Judah and Benjamin and they went down to the Valley of Salt and struck down 10, 000 men of Seir, capturing 10,000 more (who they subsequently executed). But while they were gone, the Israelites he had sent home raided Judah, killing 3,000 and taking much spoil.  Meanwhile, Amaziah had brought back idols from the Edomites he had defeated at Seir; and he became guilty of idolatry. When a prophet came to chastise him, Amaziah threatened him. The prophet then told him that God would destroy him for his iniquity.
Amaziah sent word to the king of Israel that they should meet face to face in battle. The king, also named Joash tried to dissuade him, saying “Why should you provoke trouble so that you fall, you and Judah with you?” They did do battle, and Israel defeated them, capturing Amaziah and looting Jerusalem. Amaziah escaped to Lachish after a time, but was killed and brought back to be buried.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Joash Reigns as King – 2 Chronicles 24

English: Joas was the king of the ancient King...

English: Joas was the king of the ancient Kingdom of Judah, and sole surviving son of Ahaziah. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Joash began his reign when he was seven years old, and he reigned for 40 years. In the beginning, Joash was a good king and he decided to restore the house of the Lord, which had been ravaged years earlier. He told the priests and the Levites to go out and gather money from the people to do it, but it did not get done.

So Joash called Jehoiada and told him to get the Levites to collect the tax that Moses had levied in Exodus 30:16 for the tabernacle. So they made a chest and set it outside of the gate and the people brought their tax. As it was collected, masons and carpenters were hired, and the house was restored. The house was equipped with all of the utensils that had been taken, and offerings were made regularly while Jehoiada was alive.

Then, after Jehoiada died, the princes of Judah came and paid homage to the king. The text says that he “listened to them.” But we quickly learn that what that meant was they wanted to return to their idolatry, which brought God’s wrath upon Judah and Jerusalem. Joash tried to persuade them to come back to the house of the Lord, but they would not listen. Then Jehoiada’s son, Zechariah, rose up and condemned them for their wickedness.

The idolaters’ influence over Joash was evidently quite strong; and he had Zechariah killed. As he was dying, he said “May the Lord see and avenge!” And that is indeed what happened. The Lord brought the Syrians up against them, and in their defeat, Joash was assassinated. Verse 27 says that his son, Amaziah, replaced him.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.