Paul and Barnabas Set Sail – Acts 13

The opening verses of this chapter speak of teachers and prophets –two of which are Saul and Barnabas. One of the others was named Manaen. Depending on which version you read, he is either a lifelong friend of Herod the Tetrach or his “foster-brother.” In any event, he was very close to him. The scripture offers no explanation of how he came to be a prophet. At the word from the Holy Spirit, Saul and Barnabas were sent on their first missionary journey, which would last about 1 1/2 years. In verse 9, the Bible speaks of Saul for the first time as being also called Paul.

St. Paul and St. Barnabas at Lystra.

St. Paul and St. Barnabas at Lystra. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

They traveled down first to Seleucia, then set sail to Cyprus where Barnabas was from, taking John Mark with them. They started proclaiming the word of God in the synagogue at Salamis. Then they went 90 miles to Paphos, the seat of Roman government on Cyprus. The proconsul was the highest ranking official in a Roman province. This one summoned Saul and Barnabas, wishing to hear the word of God. But a magician named Elymas (also known as Bar-Jesus), a false prophet who was with him, was working against them, trying to turn the proconsul away. Paul, filled with the Holy Spirit, rebuked the man and caused him to lose his sight. The proconsul believed after seeing this.

Verse 13 says that Paul and his companions left Pathos and sailed to Perga in Pamphylia. His companions included Barnabas and John Mark. The scripture here simply refers to him as John. He returned to Jerusalem, Luke writes; and this will be a matter for which Paul will later voice his disapproval when he and Barnabas separate in Acts 15:36-41.

After John Mark left, Paul and Barnabas went on to Antioch in Pisidia. The rulers of the synagogue there, sent a message to them, asking if they had any words of encouragement for the brethren there. Paul did have some. He came to preach in the synagogue, first giving a small historical summary of God’s plans for His people through the ages. He finished, of course, with Jesus as the promised Messiah, and detailed his rejection, crucifixion, and resurrection, citing scripture all the time.

The people were over-joyed with the gospel, and asked them to return on the next Sabbath. When they did, the entire city was practically present. But the rulers were not happy with the gospel Paul was preaching, and Paul let them have it, saying that they had “judged themselves unworthy of eternal life. He then further angered them by saying that he had been sent to preach the good news of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Acts 13, Acts 14, Acts 15, Acts 16, Acts 17

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

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Crucifixion and Resurrection – Luke 23-24

Jesus was taken away to be crucified, and there were two criminals taken with him to be put to death, fulfilling Isaiah 53:12, which said he would be numbered with transgressors. Luke says that they came to a place known as the skull. It is also known as Golgatha which comes from an Aramaic word for skull. There, they crucified Him and the criminals with one on each side of Him. Jesus said “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus...

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus, Braga, Portugal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One prisoner began to mock as well, but the other rebuked him and asked Jesus to remember him when He came into His kingdom. Jesus told him that this day he would be with Him in paradise (verse 43). Jesus, as we saw in other passages, did have the authority to forgive sins, and He exercised it there.

Joseph of Arimathea was a member of the Sanhedrin council who had not consented to their decision to railroad the Lord. Luke says that he was a good and righteous man, and was looking for the kingdom. He got custody of the body of Jesus from Pilate, and wrapped it in a linen shroud. Then he placed it in a tomb that was cut in stone and had never been used for burial. The women prepared ointment and spices. And then they rested on the Sabbath rested as commanded.

The day that Jesus rose, two of His disciples were traveling to the village of Emmaus. One was named Cleopas, but we do not know the name of the other. We are told in verse 16 that “their eyes were kept from recognizing him” when Jesus drew near. When He asks them about the conversation they are having, the two men proceed to tell him about Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus gave them a mild rebuke for being slow to believe what the prophets had spoken. He then interpreted Scriptures from Moses and the prophets concerning the Christ. The revelation of Himself to these two disciples would appear to serve one purpose – that of a proper eyewitness account.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 22, Luke 23, Luke 24, Acts 1, Acts 2

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Lord’s Supper and the Arrest of Jesus – Luke 22

In Luke 22, the Feast of the Passover is approaching, and Jesus sends Peter and John in to town to find a room. He told them exactly in detail what they would find when they got there, and it is exactly what they found. Judas, meanwhile, had already made arrangements with the chief priests and officers as to how he would betray Jesus.

English: "The Judas Kiss", (Mark 14:...

English: “The Judas Kiss”, (Mark 14:45) by Gustave Doré. Judas kisses Jesus in order to betray him to the guards. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 14-23, Jesus instituted the Lord’s supper, and also revealed that one of them would betray him. In Luke’s account, their concern and inquiry as to which one of them would be the worst (in that respect) was followed quickly by an argument between them as to which one of them was the greatest. They still just didn’t get it, and Jesus told them that the least would be the greatest. Being in the kingdom was not about being lifted up before men. It was (and still is) all out serving others.

This long chapter (66 verses) has a lot of history in it. Jesus informs Peter of his impending denial, and then he goes to the mount of Olives to pray. Next comes his betrayal by Judas and his arrest. After Peter’s denial, he is mocked and beaten, and then he was brought before the council. He gives them very little in their questioning, saying “You say that I am” when asked if he was the Son of God. That was enough for them. They would take him to Pilate to do their dirty work.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 22, Luke 23, Luke 24, Acts 1, Acts 2

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Destruction of Jerusalem Foretold Luke 20-21

In Luke 20, the chief priests and scribes challenge Jesus’ authority in verses 1-8. Then in verses 9-18, he tells the parable of the wicked tenants, citing Psalm 118:22 in verse 17: “The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone.” It is obviously about the rejection of the Son of God by the Jewish leaders, and that perception is not lost on those present. Verse 19 says that they “sought to lay hands on him that very hour.”

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus...

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus, Braga, Portugal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 19-26, they try to trap him into saying that they should not pay taxes to Caesar, so they could use that against him. He, of course, said exactly the opposite, noting whose face was on their coins. Yet they would later lie to Pilate, making the accusation that he really did say that.

Luke 21 has the story of the widow who gave all that she had at the offering box, saying that she had done more than any of those who had given larger amounts. He then begins telling them in great detail in most of the remainder of the chapter about the persecution, war and famine that awaited them because of him, along with the ultimate destruction of Jerusalem. He gives them many signs, so the Christians would know what to look for. it is because of this that many of them escaped and survived to continue to spread the gospel.

 

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Unrighteous Judge – Luke 18-19

Jesus tells the story of the unrighteous judge in chapter 18. He neither “feared God nor respected man.” A widow persistently came to him seeking justice for some wrong against her.  The judge finally relented because he realized the widow would not leave him alone until he did something.

English: Jesus entering Jerusalem on a donkey

English: Jesus entering Jerusalem on a donkey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jesus was not making the point that God will finally answer our prayers just because He finally gets weary of hearing our constant whining. The point he was making was that prayer is important, and that God does indeed listen to our prayers. Perhaps we will on some occasions “cry out” to Him day and night. But He will give justice to us speedily. Now “speedily” in God’s terms may not be exactly the time frame we have in mind. There are many more to consider than just us, and sometimes we have trials to test us and make us stronger. But justice will come.

Chapter 19 contains Luke’s account of the triumphal entry into Jerusalem. It is a momentous occasion, and it is lauded by the people as it should have been. Most of them, however, were expecting a different sort of savior, and were giving Him praise in expectation of a political upheaval that would not take place. No doubt this knowledge added to His sadness, as He once again weeps for Jerusalem in verses 41-44.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

About Rebuke – Luke 17

Jesus speaks in Luke 17 about the temptations to sin. In verses 1-4, he talks about this, and about forgiveness, and about rebuking one’s brother when he sins. This is another passage that underscores the misinterpretation and misapplication of the passages that say “judge not, lest ye be judged.”

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 16:19-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many people who know very little about the bible, know those passages very well. They are the “get out of jail free” cards for sin. “You can’t judge me!” We certainly cannot judge others. And we certainly cannot put ourselves above others. But we must be able to know when others are doing wrong — when they have gone against God’s word. If not, how can we rebuke our brother?

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Faithful In a Very Little – Luke 16

In verses 1-10 of Luke chapter 16, Jesus tells the story of the “dishonest manager.” He said in verses 10-11:

One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches?

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 16:19-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is just one of many examples in which God’s word tells us that He really does “sweat the small stuff.” No act of kindness or unkindness is too small. No act of mercy or being unmerciful is too incidental. No act of honesty or dishonesty goes unnoticed by the Lord. Integrity is of no small measure in His eyes.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 12, Luke 13, Luke 14, Luke 15, Luke 16

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Rich Toward God – Luke 12-13

One of the parables Jesus tells in chapter 12 is that of the rich man who saw how much he had and all he could think of was making room for even more. For some, no matter how much they have, it is never enough. Was Jesus speaking of this to show how wrong it is to be wealthy? Of course not, but his heart belonged to his wealth. there was no mention of taking the excess and helping those in need. No mention of how devoted he was to serving the Lord. He finished the story in verse 21, saying “So is the one who lays up treasure for himself AND is not rich toward God.” God was not in the man’s heart. Neither was anyone else.

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 12:12-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In chapter 13, Jesus is getting close to his last days in Jerusalem, and verses 31-35 contain his tearful lament for the price she would pay for her rejection of the savior. Just before his lament, verse 31 states that some Pharisees came to warn Him to leave because Herod wants to kill Him. It is one of many illustrations that there were Pharisees (and Sadducees) that were not against Him. Many, in fact. would be converted.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 12, Luke 13, Luke 14, Luke 15, Luke 16

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Take Up Your Cross – Luke 8-9

The eighth chapter of Luke lists several of the women who had become disciples — some of which, we know will be there for the crucifixion and to see the empty tomb. He calms a storm, heals Jairus’ daughter and another woman, casts out a demon, and tells the disciples the parable of the sower, as well as the purpose of the parables.

Lenten-canvas of Millstatt - The feeding of fi...

Lenten-canvas of Millstatt – The feeding of five thousand (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 16-18, he follows up on the previous verses about hearing the word, and holding it up in a good and honest heart:

No one after lighting a lamp covers it with a jar or puts it under a bed, but puts it on a stand, so that those who enter may see the light. For nothing is hidden that will not be made manifest, nor is anything secret that will not be known and come to light. Take care then how you hear, for to the one who has, more will be given, and from the one who has not, even what he thinks that he has will be taken away.

In chapter 9, Jesus sends out his 12 apostles to preach the gospel, and verses 10-17 contain Luke’s account of the feeding of the 5,000. The chapter is 62 verses long, and also contains the account of the transfiguration – as well as Jesus foretelling his own death twice. But for this post, we will look briefly at verse 23, where Jesus is speaking to the disciples and says “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.” This is a commitment that disciples, then and now, don’t always take seriously.  Being a follower of Jesus is a daily exercise. It is more important than our jobs and (as he emphasizes in verse 62) anything else in our lives on earth.

 /Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 7, Luke 8, Luke 9, Luke 10, Luke 11

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

John the Baptist’s Doubt – Luke 7

Jesus does many important things in the seventh chapter of Luke. First, there is the healing of the Roman Centurion’s servant in verses 1-10. Then there is the miraculous raising if the widow’s son in verses 11-17. In verses 36-50, Jesus is ding with one of the Pharisees when a woman “of the city, who was a sinner” comes to wash his feet, crying as she did so. Jesus forgave her sins, which causes a stir among those that were “at table” with them.

Saint John the Baptist and the Pharisees

Saint John the Baptist and the Pharisees (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

But just as remarkable as any of those event, Jesus is visited by the disciples of John the Baptist. They said “John the Baptist has sent us to you, saying, ‘Are you the one who is to come, or shall we look for another?'” Jesus pointed them to things that He was doing that John would certainly recognize from prophecy. But many wonder at this expression of doubt, and some even attempt to explain it away.

The fact of the matter is that most of the Jews, including John, had been expecting something more worldly in the kingdom of the Messiah. In John’s time, they would certainly want liberation from Roman oppression. But that is the reason that so many of them missed the coming of the Messiah altogether.

We should not be too hard on John for this. It merely goes to show that even the “best” of us experience doubt from time to time. When we do, it is the Scriptures to which we must turn, just as Jesus pointed John to them. The answer is always there. We just have to search for it.

 /Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 7, Luke 8, Luke 9, Luke 10, Luke 11

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.