Hezekiah Reigns as King – 2 Chronicles 29-30

Ezechias-Hezekiah was the son of Ahaz and the ...

Ezechias-Hezekiah was the son of Ahaz and the 14th king of Judah. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After the death of Ahaz, his son Hezekiah began his reign at the age of 25. Here was a breath of fresh air as far as kings go in the southern kingdom. After the miserable reign of his father, the temple was in poor shape. Hezekiah set about getting the temple cleansed, and he called the Levites together and charged them with consecrating themselves, cleansing the temple, and restoring worship in the temple. They completed the task, and the people celebrated and rejoiced with thank offerings. Notice in verse 17, it took 16 days to cleanse and consecrate the temple. Ahaz had caused all of this.

Hezekiah wrote letters and sent couriers throughout Israel and Judah telling the people to consecrate themselves and come to celebrate the Passover. Some of them laughed and mocked, but many did come. Some did not consecrate themselves, however. Hezekiah prayed on their behalf, saying “May the good Lord pardon everyone who sets his heart to seek God, the Lord, the God of his fathers, even though not according to the sanctuary’s rules of cleanness.” Verse 26 says that God heard him and that He healed the people. The festivities were good for the people and it was a great time of spiritual awakening. Verse 23 says that the whole assembly agreed to keep the feast an extra seven days.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

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Jotham and Ahaz – 2 Chronicles 27-28

English: Ahaz was king of Judah, and the son a...

English: Ahaz was king of Judah, and the son and successor of Jotham. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Uzziah died, his son Jotham became king at the age of 25. His mother was from the line of Zadok – a priest during David’s reign. He is said in the scriptures to have done right in God’s eyes. He built cities and forts, and he fought successfully against the Ammonites. After his victory, they paid yearly tribute to him, which increased his might and the wealth of the kingdom. His reign lasted 16 years until his death.

His son, Ahaz became king next. His reign also lasted 16 years, but it was a terrible 16 years. Ahaz was one of the most wicked and corrupt of the kings of the southern kingdom. He made idols of the Baals for worship, and even burned his own sons as an offering. God gave him up first to the Syrians and then to the king of Israel. But he did not learn his lesson. He began worship of the gods of Syria, thinking he would enjoy their success as a result. As things continued to get worse (including having thousands killed and thousands more taken captive) he sent for help from the Assyrians, and even paid them tribute. But instead, the Assyrians came against them as well.

His blasphemy and idolatry continued still until his death. He “cut in pieces the vessels of the house of God, and he shut up the doors of the house of the Lord, and he made himself altars in every corner of Jerusalem.” His reign was certainly one of the most miserable of times for God’s people.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

 

Micah of Moresheth-Gath

Often, when the Bible talks about or introduces a prophet or someone else of importance, it does so by referring to their lineage – usually their father (Isaiah “the son of Amoz,” Jonah “son of Amittai,” James and John  “sons of Zebedee”). But Micah is introduced as Micah “of Moresheth” (verse 1), otherwise known as Moresheth-gath (verse 14). Moresheth-Gath was a town in Judah’s Shephela – a lowland region in south-central Israel. It was captured by Sennacherib in 701 B.C.

A mound, or tell, of Maresha, one suggested site of Micah's hometown Moresheth.

A mound, or tell, of Maresha, one suggested site of Micah’s hometown Moresheth.

Verse one lists the kings of Judah during Micah’s time (Jotham 750 – 735 B.C., Ahaz 735 – 715 B.C., and Hezekiah 715 – 687 B.C.). This means that he was around roughly at the same time as Isaiah and Hosea. But since Uzziah (767 – 739 B.C.) is not listed, we can be fairly certain that he prophesied during the latter half of that century. He was from the southern kingdom, but prophesied to both the northern kingdom (Samaria here) and the southern kingdom. The message was of the same problems some of the other prophets spoke about – idolatry, of course, and social injustice (the rich oppressing the poor usually).

Assyria’s power was ever-increasing, but Israel was not economically affected during the first half of the eighth century. In fact, a wealthy upper class became increasingly prevalent. And along with them came more idolatry and more oppression of the poor. Then comes Ahaz, who was nothing more than a puppet for Assyria, followed by heavy taxes by the state of Assyria, which led to even more oppression of the poor. Micah’s message was that doom was coming. But he did offer hope in that there would ultimately be a restoration. He would have been there for the saving of Jerusalem from the Assyrians under Hezekiah (2 Kings 18-19), as well as for the ultimate defeat by the empire

In chapter 5, Micah brings the prophecy of a ruler to be born in Bethlehem – a town nobody would have considered important. Micah 5:2 is cited in Matthew 2:6 and John 7:42. The abiding theme of the book is of judgment and of salvation (compare chapter 2 with chapter 5). It is about a God who keeps His promises – even those that say He will bring destruction on the wicked if they do not repent. And it is about a God who is both a king and a shepherd, and will forgive and restore a remnant. But that king will exercise vengeance on the nations that do not obey (Micah 5:1-15).

/Bob’s boy
___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.