So That You May Not Grow Weary – Hebrews 12-13

In Hebrews chapter 12, the writer offers encouragement to the Christians he addresses. Some were no doubt experiencing persecution. All throughout the gospel, we are told of trials and suffering that we will endure. It should, then, come as no surprise to us when they occur.

English: Pagans kill Christians in Pliska.

English: Pagans kill Christians in Pliska. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The writer speaks of trials that we experience because of the sinful world that we live in. Those who dwell in that darkness are hostile to us, as they were then. On that subject, he reminds them of Jesus:

Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted.  In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood.

That is true of most of us. But many have died in those days, and even today we see that Christians are being killed for their faith.  So then in chapter 13, he quotes from Psalm 27:1, saying “The Lord is my helper; I will not fear; what can man do to me?”

We might say, “well they can kill me!” Jesus said in Luke 12:4: “do not fear those who kill the body, and after that have nothing more that they can do.” Our lives here in a world that is not our home are simply the beginning. Beyond this life, no man has power of any kind over us.

The other kind of suffering the writer talks about has to do with the normal day-to-day trials, pain, grief, and yes, even suffering of a physical and mental nature. God does not cause bad things to happen to us. But He will allow them to happen if it will strengthen us and build our endurance.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Hebrews

Heb. 9, Heb. 10, Heb. 11, Heb. 12, Heb. 13

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

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Stirring Up One Another – Hebrews 10-11

Beginning in verse 11 of Hebrews chapter 10, the writer compares the sacrifices made by the priests under the old law to the sacrifice of Jesus Christ:

And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified.

Frans Floris - The Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, ...

Frans Floris – The Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, Son of God, Gathering and Protecting Mankind – WGA7949 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And then, speaking of how Christians must work together to hold one another up, verses 23-25 explain what we have discussed before in this blog about “going to church.” So many people are convinced that they can serve God just as well from their own living rooms. But like so many other references, this passage explains that we need each other, and Christianity is not about one’s own selfishness. Salvation cannot be obtained without giving of yourself to your brethren:

And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.

Chapter 11 is the well-known “faith” chapter, speaking in detailed examples of faith throughout the scriptures. Verse one is most famous: “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.

But the writer is not talking about simply a “blind” faith, as skeptics would have you believe. We have a reasoned faith because of a great many evidences that we only have to open our eyes to see. We know that is true because God tells us all throughout the Bible, as Paul told the Romans in Romans 1:18-25:

For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Hebrews

Heb. 9, Heb. 10, Heb. 11, Heb. 12, Heb. 13

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

A Better “High Priest”- Hebrews 5-6

In chapter 5, the writer of Hebrews starts the chapter with an explanation of all that he had to say previously about Jesus being a “high priest.” Many Jews would appreciate the analogy because they were accustomed to having a high priest. In verse 6, he states that He was a priest “after the order of Melchizedek.”  This was quoted from Psalm 110:4.

Jewish high priest wearing a hoshen, and Levit...

Jewish high priest wearing a hoshen, and Levites in ancient Judah. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The writer tells them that there is more he needs to tell them, but then begins a rebuke. He tells them that they have become “dull of hearing,” and that by now they should be teaching others. But instead, they are in need of “milk” instead of “solid food.” Those he was addressing had not grown spiritually. And how does on e become mature? The writer says it is attained by “those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.

Verses 4-8 of chapter 6 do not mean that there is a sin that is unforgivable. It simply means that it can be much harder for one who has tasted of salvation to come back once they stray than for someone to be converted who has never heard the gospel.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Hebrews

Heb. 4, Heb. 5, Heb. 6, Heb. 7, Heb. 8

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Hebrews 11 – By Faith

Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refused to bow to the Babylonian king's golden statue, so the king ordered them thrown into a fiery furnace. But God protected them (Daniel 3)

Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refused to bow to the Babylonian king’s golden statue, so the king ordered them thrown into a fiery furnace. But God protected them (Daniel 3)

Famous for the great description of faith in verse 1 (“faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen”), Hebrews 11 is (arguably most unfortunately) often called the “Hall of Faith” or the “Faith Hall of Fame.” Most of the accounts of people in this chapter are familiar to most people.  Some of the references are not so clear, and some maybe not so familiar.  Verse 33’s reference to those who “quenched the power of fire” is likely of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego from Daniel 2:49-3:30.  Verse 35’s women who “received back their dead by resurrection” is likely (among others) of Elijah raising the son of the widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:17-24) and Elisha raising the son of a Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:18-37).  Verse 37’s gruesome deaths may refer to the extra-biblical accounts of the deaths of Jeremiah and Isaiah.

But this chapter is not an account of extraordinary men and women with supreme faith.  It is rather the story of ordinary men and women like you and me, who because of their faith in God, were blessed with the power and grace of His mighty hand.  It is the story of their endurance and perseverance through all manner of evil against them and bitter times, and how that endurance saw them through it by their faith.  It is the assurance that the recipients of this letter can persevere by their faith through the endurance the writer encouraged them to have in chapter 10.  It is the assurance that we can do it as well.  We have a better promise, through a better covenant, and if we are faithful, we will receive our reward – which will be the same perfect reward those mentioned in this chapter will ultimately receive (verses 39-40).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Reading Revelation \ Week 50 summary posted

This week, we will start with one more chapter from the Epistle to the Hebrews, then we will finish the year with four chapters from the Book of Revelation.  We cannot do justice to the latter in just four days of reading,  but we can get an overview of how the book brings an ending to the story of the Bible we began in Genesis this year.  This book is intimidating to many people, and it certainly can be challenging.  It is also one of the most misunderstood and misinterpreted books of the Bible.  But it is not as difficult to read or to understand if one keeps in mind the context in which it was written.

The Angel Appears to John. The book of Revelat...

The Angel Appears to John. The book of Revelation. 13th century manuscript. British Library, London. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John wrote this epistle (yes Revelation is a letter) to Christians in the first century about first century times; and it was intended to strengthen their faith and hope during times that were extremely difficult – and promised to become even more so.  There was much Apocalyptic literature around in those times, and people were used to such imagery and symbolism.  But those same two things have led many scholars to come away with misguided ideas – such as the supposition that Jesus failed at a first attempt to establish an earthly kingdom, and is going to do it successfully (for a thousand years?) in the future.  The very idea of the Lord failing at anything is ludicrous, and shows a total misunderstanding of what the kingdom is in the first place.  Also, where many commentators and scholars go awry is in trying to give prophetic (and often even literal) meaning to every single detail.   Others want part of a passage full of imagery to be literal, and part to be figurative, so they can “pigeon-hole” it into the prophetic word they wish it to be.

For those interested in a more in-depth reading of Revelation, we would like to recommend a very well-written and informative book that aids in understanding Apocalyptic literature contained in such books of the Bible as Isaiah, Daniel, Ezekiel, Joel, and yes, Revelation in particular.  The name of the book is “Understanding Apocalyptic Literature (A Guide to the Book of Revelation)” by Mark Roberts.  It is an easy read – less than 100 pages; and this writer benefited enormously from reading it before tackling Revelation during last year’s full Bible reading schedule.  It is well worth the very low price (5.99 at the time of this writing), and can be purchased at this link.

It is helpful first to understand what Apocalyptic literature is.  The word Apocalypse is associated today with an “end of time” situation, the end of the world in particular.  But that is a view of the term that has been perverted over time.  Translated literally from Greek, it is “a disclosure of knowledge, hidden from humanity in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception.”

Page 289r: The Opening of the Fifth and Sixth ...

Page 289r: The Opening of the Fifth and Sixth Seals, Revelation 6:9-16 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is tremendous value to the Book of Revelation for us today, as with all of God’s word.  But we must remember that as Revelation 1:1, and other passages of the book state, it was to show “the things that must soon take place.”  It does not predict things like the tragedy of 9-11, or even good things like the establishment of the United Nations, as some have claimed.  “Revelation does not address life in our times because that was of no interest or help to its original audiences… It promises God’s action soon” (Roberts, 2011).

So what understanding should one have after reading the Book of Revelation?  If you come away with the assurance that, although there is great evil in the world and it wants to thwart and utterly defeat the followers of Jesus Christ, that there is more to be hopeful for than just this earthly life, and that in the end, Jesus will be triumphant, then you have understood the message of the book as it was intended.

Works Cited

Roberts, Mark.  “Understanding Apocalyptic Literature” A Guide to the Book of Revelation.  Temple Terrace, Florida: Florida College Press, 2011.

Summing Up

Each weekend, I am now posting a small PDF of one week of chapter summaries (on the website’s “Summaries” page), current to the beginning of the previous week.  I have posted the summary for Week 50 (December Week 2) of the schedule I am following.  This short PDF document contains condensed comments about 1 Peter 1, 1 Peter 2, and Hebrews 3, 4, and 5, with hyperlinks to the ESV version of each chapter for listening or reading, and joins the summaries for other weeks already posted there.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Hebrews 10 – The Full Assurance of Faith

In the previous chapters of this letter, the writer has been driving home the superiority of the new covenant, and of Jesus as our high priest.  He continues in verse one, stating that the law was just “a shadow of the good things to come instead of the true form of these realities.”    The sacrifices of old, year after year, were just a temporary forgiveness of sins because “it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.”  But Jesus Christ came to do God’s will (verses 5-7 quote Psalm 40:6-8), and offered Himself up as a single sacrifice for all time (verses 10-12).

Crucifixion

Crucifixion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Verses 19-23 bring it all home.  Whereas before we as servants of God could not enter the holy place, Jesus has torn the curtain – the veil – open for all time (an allusion to the literal event of Matthew 27:51-52 when Jesus was crucified).  And because we have “a great priest over the house of God,” we can draw near with confidence, clean from evil conscience, and with a true heart – full of the assurance of faith that our sins are forgiven.  We can now hold fast to our hope without wavering because “he who promised is faithful.”

Verses 24-25 are quoted often to remind us that we need to be faithful in attendance of worship, as it says:

“…let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another…”

Those who claim they can serve the Lord themselves without being part of a worship service ignore this passage at their own peril.  How can we “stir up one another” or “encourage one another” if we do not meet together, as the writer, inspired by the Holy Spirit, says?  Verse 26, and following, warn of the danger of trying to “go it alone.” It is far too easy to slip away from the path, and back into sin.  As verse 31 says, “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.”

We need each other because that encouragement, those things that “stir up one another” help give us endurance.  And we “have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised.”

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Hebrews 9 – Redemption Through the Blood of Christ

When Aaron prepared the Levites for consecration, he adjusted the seven lamps of the menorah, candlestick, or lampstand forward.(Numbers 8:1-4).

When Aaron prepared the Levites for consecration, he adjusted the seven lamps of the menorah, candlestick, or lampstand forward.(Numbers 8:1-4).

When considering this chapter’s beginning, as it speaks of the tabernacle prepared by Moses instead of the Herodian temple, it is because the theme of the writer is that of the covenant being “inaugurated” (verse 18), or “sealed.” Moses did so with the blood of animals, as verses 19-21 remind us.   As verse 22 says, “Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins.”  Jesus Christ sealed the new covenant with His own blood.

The tabernacle and the items inside (the lampstand, table, the Bread of the Presence, etc) described in the first few verses, are detailed for the most part in Exodus 25, 30 and 37. As the text says, only the high priest could enter the section that was the “Most Holy Place,” and even he could only do so once a year – to offer blood for himself and for the unintentional sins of others (verse 7) – which had to be repeated each year.  All these things, it says, were mere copies of the heavenly things (verse 23).  Jesus entered the true “Most Holy Place” which is heaven, by offering His own blood – “once for all” and “thus securing an eternal redemption” for us all.  Verse 28 concludes with the glorious promise for us: “so Christ, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, will appear a second time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for him.”

The Arch of Titus from outside the Forum, Rome, Italy.  Located at the highest point of the Via Sacra which leads to the Roman Forum, this triumphal arch, with only one passageway, commemorates Titus' conquest of Judea which ended the Jewish Wars (66-70). Engaged fluted columns frame the passageway.

The Arch of Titus from outside the Forum, Rome, Italy. Located at the highest point of the Via Sacra which leads to the Roman Forum, this triumphal arch, with only one passageway, commemorates Titus’ conquest of Judea which ended the Jewish Wars (66-70). Engaged fluted columns frame the passageway.

As an aside, Coffman offers some interesting facts regarding the Holy things of the temple:

History, through the overruling providence of God, has preserved a likeness of the golden candlestick that was in the Herodian temple destroyed by Vespasian and Titus in 70 A.D. The candlestick, along with other treasures, was looted and carried in the triumphal procession in Rome; and, when the Arch of Titus was constructed to memorialize the victory, both the table of showbread and the candlestick were detailed in the carvings decorating the arch and may still be seen there in the excavated ruins of ancient Rome. Plaster casts of those carvings are exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum, New York; and from these is evident the immense weight of those golden treasures, several men being necessary to bear each of them.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Hebrews 8 – Jesus, High Priest of a Better Covenant

Moses makes the tabernacle in the wilderness -- Exodus 35-40.

Moses makes the tabernacle in the wilderness — Exodus 35-40.

The Hebrew writer gets to the meat of Jesus as our High Priest, affirming that He sits at the right hand of God in the “true tent” (or tabernacle).  The earthly tabernacle serves as a shadow of the entrance into God’s presence, whereas heaven is where Jesus is in true presence and intercession for us.  Jesus “has obtained a ministry that is as much more excellent than the old as the covenant he mediates is better, since it is enacted on better promises” (verse 6).  On that new covenant, verses 8-12 quote Jeremiah 31:31-34, which foreshadows the covenant we now have with the Lord, through the blood of Jesus Christ.  Verse 13 says that the old covenant is made obsolete, as we now have full forgiveness freely available through Him.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Hebrews 7 – Jesus Compared to Melchizedek

The Hebrew writer has already, in previous chapters, made much mention of Jesus being our High Priest, after the order of Melchizedek.  But who was this Melchizedek?  We know only as much, as always, as God ordained important for us to know.  The Old Testament only speaks of him in two places – Genesis 14:17-20, and again in the Messianic royal Psalm 110 (110:4), which is quoted here in this chapter again.  After Abraham came back from rescuing his abducted kinsman, Lot, and after what is called here “the slaughter of the kings” (see Genesis 14:1-16), he was visited by Melchizedek, “king of Salem” and “priest of God Most High,” who blessed him.  Some believe that the Salem mentioned here is the same historical location as Jerusalem, but we do not know for sure, as another possibility exists.  The name is related to the Hebrew word for “peace,” and Melchizedek translates to “king of righteousness.”

Having conquered Sodom, Kedorlaomer left for his home country, taking many captives with him. Abram learned what had happened and chased Kedorlaomer past Dan and beyond Damascus. There he defeated the king and rescued the captives, among them Lot. After Abram (Abraham) rescued Lot from Kedorlaomer, he met Melchizedek, a king and a priest of God. Abram gave ten percent of (tithed) all he had recovered.

Having conquered Sodom, Kedorlaomer left for his home country, taking many captives with him. Abram learned what had happened and chased Kedorlaomer past Dan and beyond Damascus. There he defeated the king and rescued the captives, among them Lot. After Abram (Abraham) rescued Lot from Kedorlaomer, he met Melchizedek, a king and a priest of God. Abram gave ten percent of (tithed) all he had recovered.

What is of note here, is that the Hebrew writer points out that Melchizedek was superior to Abraham, and blessed him.  From Abraham’s loins, Levi would come; and it was only the Levitical line that could be priests among the Israelites.  But Abraham paid tithes to this “priest of God Most High,” and so he was greater than even those priests – though he was both not a Levite, nor even a Jew.  Yet he held two distinct positions – that of king and priest, and is exalted as “great” here, and the writer declares that “it is beyond dispute that the inferior is blessed by the superior” (verse 7).  It is after this order that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, became our High Priest, though He was not from the tribe of Levi either.

What about verse 3?  It says of Melchizedek: “He is without father or mother or genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but resembling the Son of God he continues a priest forever.”  Melchizedek is a real historical figure of the Old Testament, and the best way to think of this is that he has no recorded genealogy in Scripture which is intended to validate his priesthood.  In addition, unlike the Levitical priests, has no recorded death which transfers his priesthood to another, so he continues as one forever, just as Jesus continues forever as our High Priest and King.  The former priests were “prevented by death from continuing in office” (verse 23).  So the Law requiring the priest to be a Levite (Numbers 18) has been set aside by Jesus, “the guarantor of a better covenant” (verse 22).

Our High Priest has no need to offer sacrifices like the Aaronic priests, because “he did this once for all when he offered up himself” (verse 27).  He is unstained by sin, this perfect Son of God, who was made priest with an oath of the Lord (verses 17, 21, 28, Psalm 110:4).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Hebrews 6 – The Certainty of God’s Promise

The Hebrew writer continues in this chapter after his rebuke to the recipients of the letter in chapter 5, stating that it is time to move from “the elementary doctrine of Christ and go on to maturity….” This does not mean that the first principles of Christianity to which he refers are unimportant, or that they should be forgotten.  Rather, it is time for them to grow into maturity spiritually;  and they will do that (as will we) by diligently studying the Scriptures and “by constant practice to distinguish good from evil” as stated in 5:14.

Jordan River, traditional site of Jesus' baptism

Jordan River, traditional site of Jesus’ baptism

Verses 4-8 do not refer to sin that is unforgivable by God.  As 1 John 1:7 says the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin.”  But the text does make it plain that those who have been saved can fall away from the Lord, and we must be careful.  When he says that it is impossible to bring such a person who once “shared in the Holy Spirit” back to repentance, he means it is impossible for his fellow Christians to bring that person to repentance if his heart has been hardened.  Nothing is impossible for God, however, and He has and does bring some who have fallen into apostasy back.  But living a life of sin once one has known the truth can result in a condition of heart and spirit from which there is no return.

Verses 13-20 remind us of the promise God made to Abraham and his heirs – that He made it with an oath, and it is impossible for God to lie (Titus 1:1-2), promising the faithful heirs eternal life.  And as Christians, baptized into Christ, we are those heirs (Galatians 3:27-29).  As verses 19-20 conclude, we have that hope as a steadfast anchor through Jesus “having become a high priest forever after the order of Melchizedek.”

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.