Psalm 105, 113 – High Above All Nations!

Psalm 105 is the second of four psalms that contain substantial historical narratives (Psalm 78, 105, 106, and 136).  Unlike Psalm 78, this one does not recount any of the disobedience of the people along the way. The first 15 verses are also found almost word for word in 1 Chronicles 16:8-22, which has prompted some debate over which was written first. Regardless, this is a hymn of praise to God; and the historical content serves to demonstrate God’s faithfulness to His people, the fulfillment of His promises, and His care for them along the way.

Isaac Blessing Jacob, painting by Govert Flinc...

Isaac Blessing Jacob, painting by Govert Flinck (Rijksmuseum Amsterdam). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Verses 1-6 are a general call for thanksgiving and praise to the Lord. Verses 7-11 recall His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and His promise confirmed to Israel of the land of Canaan as an inheritance. Verses 12-15 tell of His care and protection as they sojourned in the land of Canaan prior to Egyptian bondage, and His protection of them from those who might do them harm. Verses 16-22 detail the life and rise of Joseph, while verses 23-25 deal with the years in Egypt leading up to the time of Moses. Egypt is referred to as the land of Ham because in the “table of nations” (Genesis 10), Egypt is named as one of the sons of Ham.

Verses 26-36 detail Moses and Aaron’s arrival on the scene, as well as the plagues God brought on Egypt. Verses 37-42 tell of the Exodus and the wilderness wandering. The chapter concludes in verses 43-45 with confirmation that God gave the land over to them, followed by final words of praise to God for his faithfulness to that promise.

Psalm 113 is a short hymn full of great praise, exalting the Lord our God “who is seated on high.” It is a hymn in which the people sing of a great and majestic God who loves and cares for the poor and those who are in need (verses 7-9). Verses 7-8 are almost word for word a part of Hannah’s song (1 Samuel 2:8).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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1 Kings 6 – Solomon Builds the Temple

The significance of verse one is that it gives us the ability to date the time of the Exodus – 480 years prior to the fourth year of Solomon’s reign.  The accepted date for that year of Salomon’s  reign is 966-967 BCE.  Although there is some argument for the application of the number of years, the more credible date for the Exodus seems to be about 1466-1467 BCE.  The detail of the temple’s construction is pretty specific, and was quite expensive (not all the gold used – most of it captured in the victorious the Israelites had over the various Canaanite cities).

English: Solomon and the Plan for the Temple, ...

English: Solomon and the Plan for the Temple, as in 1 Kings 6, illustration from a Bible card published by the Providence Lithograph Company (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The exact dimensions are somewhat disputed due to the variance of the length of a cubit at different time, but as temple’s go, it would not have been the huge building that some of us might imagine. But the description is of a grandly beautiful temple for the Lord’s house.  God restates (in verse 11-13) the promises He made to David in 2 Samuel 7:11-16, but it is not an unconditional promise.  Note in verse 12, that God makes no promise to “hang around” if they are disobedient.

A beautiful structure indeed, but that obedience is more important to Him than the grandest of temples.  Remember that people (including the apostles) were very impressed with the temple that existed when Jesus was in Jerusalem.  But he foretold its utter destruction (as in Luke 21:5-6).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Exodus 24 – The Covenant Confirmed

English: The Covenant Confirmed, by John Steep...

Image via Wikipedia

Today, we move on to the 24th chapter of Exodus at the end of what is known as the Book of the Covenant, which began in chapter 20.  The covenant with the Lord is confirmed with blood (verses 6 and 8).  In verses 9-11, man eats in God’s presence – the closest yet to the relationship man had with Him in the garden of Eden.  Verse 4 is our first reference to Moses writing down the words of the Lord.

Verse 13 is our first reference to Joshua as Moses’ assistant, as he accompanies Moses until he finishes the journey into the mountain of God, where he remains for 40 days and nights.  Aaron, his sons Nadab and Abihu, and the rest of the elders also remain below, as the Lord commanded.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Robert
___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Exodus 19 – Israel at Mount Sinai

Deutsch: Sinai Halbinsel, Aussicht vom Mosesbe...

Image via Wikipedia

Verses 1-3 tell us how Israel arrives at Sinai to worship the Lord on the mountain as God told Moses they would in Exodus 3:12.  Peter refers to verses 5-6 in 1 Peter 2:9-10, as he applies what is said of the Lord’s people here to the church.  The instructions to Moses to consecrate the people and to set boundaries they cannot cross (verses 10-13, and 23-24) prepare them for life as it will be when the tabernacle is built.  The instructions for abstaining from sexual relations are merely part of the consecration at this time, and should not be construed as more.

As we have learned from other passages, the Lord could manifest Himself in any number of ways that He sees fitting.  In this case, the spectacle He creates in verses 16-20 serves to demonstrate that He has been speaking to Moses from the mountain, which is made holy because of His presence – and that the people would do well to listen to Moses.

The sights and sounds – the smoke, fire, and trembling of the mountain (verse 18) bring fear and expectation for the Lord’s people, as though something great was happening here.  And indeed it was.  The words that the Lord conveyed to Moses would shape the very lives of His people, and things would never be the same as they once were.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Robert
___________________
image via Wikipedia

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.