The Events of the Days

The Books of I and II Chronicles, like Kings and Samuel, were originally one book. The Hebrew title for the book (“Dibre Hayyamim“) is often translated “The events (or annals) of the days.” We like the fact that the Septuagint calls it “the things omitted,” as that seems the very best description – for it contains much that Samuel and Kings do not.  But the overriding message throughout the book is the faithfulness of God to his covenant with His people through the house of David.

English: Table of nations according to genesis...

English: Table of nations according to genesis 10 Nederlands: Volkerenlijst naar genesis 10 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1 Chronicles 3:17-24 contains the names of a list of descendants of David that is at least 5 generations beyond the exile, and so it seems reasonable to date the beginning of the writings to at least 400 B.C., and possibly a few decades afterward. With the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the temple by the Babylonians under Nebuchadnezzar, the Davidic kingdom was overthrown, and there was no longer a nation of Judah. Babylon, however, fell to the Persians in 538 B.C., and after the decree of Cyrus, the returning exiles (with much help from Ezra and Nehemiah) eventually got the temple rebuilt, as well as the walls around Jerusalem. But where did that leave God’s people if there was no more monarchy of David’s house? What was God’s plan, and where did that leave the covenant made to David in 2 Samuel 7?

This is the main purpose of the Book of Chronicles – to reinforce faith in the promise of the Davidic throne through a clear and precise record of the nation’s history from the perspective of the remnant of the southern kingdom and its rulers. As the book was written, a start in rebuilding had been made in the temple and in Jerusalem, but the people must not repeat the mistakes of the past. And so those who had not been there must learn all about it.

The genealogy of the first nine chapters of 1 Chronicles begins in verses 1-3 of chapter one – from Adam to Noah and his three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japeth. From here, it begins to read very much like what we know now as “The Table of Nations” in Genesis 10. Verses 5-24 give us the sons of each of Noah’s sons, etc. down to Abraham, and thus the names of nations – many of which are very familiar to us now through geography, history, and other biblical reference, such as Canaan, Egypt, Cush, and Uz (from Job).

Verses 28-54 give us the generations from Abraham to Jacob (Israel), but only Jacob’s brother Esau is the focus of the genealogical record from verse 35 onward in this chapter. Jacob’s descendants will be covered at great length beginning in chapter 2. These 29 verses are all devoted to the nation of Edom, which Esau fathered, many of which would be bitter enemies with Israel and Judah in times to come.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
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some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Psalm 89:27-52 – Will You Hide Yourself Forever?

In this second half of Psalm 89, it quickly becomes apparent that it must indeed have been written after the exile and the capture and deportation of king Jehoiachin. Where we pick up verse 27, the psalmist is still writing a rather long section that is quoting God – His promise and covenant with David (2 Samuel 7), as well as His warning to Solomon of what will happen if David’s heirs stray from Him (1 Kings 9).

The Anointing of Solomon by Cornelis de Vos. A...

The Anointing of Solomon by Cornelis de Vos. According to 1 Kings 1:39, Solomon was anointed by Zadok. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The psalmist is “reminding” the Lord of His promises, yet he acknowledges that the heirs to David’s throne did exactly what the Lord warned against. Still, he seems to be faltering in his confidence that God is going to keep His covenant with David alive now.  Verses 38-45 in particular accentuate that sentiment, and verse 39 specifically says so, saying “You have renounced the covenant with your servant; you have defiled his crown in the dust.” The latter part of that verse obviously refers to Jehoiachin’s fate.

Verse 46 is where the psalmist specifically acknowledges that the things that have happened are a result of God’s wrath against His unfaithful people: “How long, O Lord? Will you hide yourself forever? How long will your wrath burn like fire?” Verses 50-51 do indeed suggest a time before the Lord dealt with the Edomites and the others who betrayed Israel, as it speaks of all of the nations that now mock them.

In verse 49, the psalmist questions the Lord earnestly about when the end of His anger will come: “Lord, where is your steadfast love of old, which by your faithfulness you swore to David?” He ends his prayer with “Blessed be the Lord forever! Amen and Amen.”

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
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some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

Psalm 105, 113 – High Above All Nations!

Psalm 105 is the second of four psalms that contain substantial historical narratives (Psalm 78, 105, 106, and 136).  Unlike Psalm 78, this one does not recount any of the disobedience of the people along the way. The first 15 verses are also found almost word for word in 1 Chronicles 16:8-22, which has prompted some debate over which was written first. Regardless, this is a hymn of praise to God; and the historical content serves to demonstrate God’s faithfulness to His people, the fulfillment of His promises, and His care for them along the way.

Isaac Blessing Jacob, painting by Govert Flinc...

Isaac Blessing Jacob, painting by Govert Flinck (Rijksmuseum Amsterdam). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Verses 1-6 are a general call for thanksgiving and praise to the Lord. Verses 7-11 recall His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and His promise confirmed to Israel of the land of Canaan as an inheritance. Verses 12-15 tell of His care and protection as they sojourned in the land of Canaan prior to Egyptian bondage, and His protection of them from those who might do them harm. Verses 16-22 detail the life and rise of Joseph, while verses 23-25 deal with the years in Egypt leading up to the time of Moses. Egypt is referred to as the land of Ham because in the “table of nations” (Genesis 10), Egypt is named as one of the sons of Ham.

Verses 26-36 detail Moses and Aaron’s arrival on the scene, as well as the plagues God brought on Egypt. Verses 37-42 tell of the Exodus and the wilderness wandering. The chapter concludes in verses 43-45 with confirmation that God gave the land over to them, followed by final words of praise to God for his faithfulness to that promise.

Psalm 113 is a short hymn full of great praise, exalting the Lord our God “who is seated on high.” It is a hymn in which the people sing of a great and majestic God who loves and cares for the poor and those who are in need (verses 7-9). Verses 7-8 are almost word for word a part of Hannah’s song (1 Samuel 2:8).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

Psalm 111 – Great Are the Lord’s Works

Preceding Psalm 112, which is clearly a psalm of wisdom, this hymn of praise and thanksgiving begins with recognition of the great works of the Lord on behalf of His chosen people. The theme is the splendor an majesty of the acts of power and might that only God Himself could possibly work.

When the Israelites were safely across the Red Sea, crossing on dry land, Moses stretched out his hands and the waters of the sea poured back over the Egyptians and their chariots (Exodus 14:23-31).

When the Israelites were safely across the Red Sea, crossing on dry land, Moses stretched out his hands and the waters of the sea poured back over the Egyptians and their chariots (Exodus 14:23-31).

He has caused His works to be remembered by His people through their grateful word passed down through the generations as He had willed them to do (Exodus 12:25-27, Job 4:1-7) – and by His holy word through His prophets. It reminds us that God cares for His people (“He provides food for those who fear him; he remembers his covenant forever”). Verses 6-9 appear to continue the covenant remembrance as it recalls deliverance from Egypt. The psalm concludes in verse 10 with a phrase pointing to Proverbs 9:10 (“The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom”).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

Genesis 9 – God’s Covenant With Noah

God blesses Noah and his sons, and where he had previously given man the plants to eat, now God has also “given” man the fish and creeping things to eat. But man is forbidden to eat meat with its blood because life is in the blood. There will be more on that from God and from Moses later.

God establishes a covenant with Noah, his offspring, and with every living creature. He will never again destroy all life on the earth with a flood. Note that He does not promise there will never be ANY floods, but that the earth will never again be destroyed with one – even more proof against the suggestion that it could have been a “local” flood. Note also that in verse 13, God does not say that he just now set his bow in the sky – that rainbows didn’t exist before. We do not know whether the scientific properties for such had been already created or not.  He is simply saying that now it shall be sign of this covenant.

Ham’s sin against his father Noah was disrespect and humiliation. Noah’s curse of Ham’s son Canaan foretells the judgment that will later befall the Canaanites. We will read much more of Canaan’s line.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

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Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.
/Robert