Rising Star

The 13th chapter of 1 Chronicles takes up with David making plans to bring the ark of the covenant to Jerusalem. The ark symbolized God’s presence and His covenant under Moses. Though it was revered and kept holy, it had been seriously neglected throughout the reign of Saul, and had been in Kiriath-jearim for some time. Now David, attempting to assemble and unite the nation, was making plans to transport it from the house of Abinadab (1 Samuel 7:1).

 

The Chastisement of Uzzah

The Chastisement of Uzzah (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

So they loaded on a cart, and Uzzah and his brother drove the cart. But as the oxen stumbled, Uzzah reached out to take hold of it, and God struck him dead. David had gone about this all wrong. Only the Kohathites were allowed to carry the ark – with poles, for even they could not touch it “lest they die” (Numbers 3:29-31, Numbers 4:15). David was angry with God and afraid, and had the ark taken to the house of Obed-edom the Gittite, where it would remain until he could figure out the proper way to transport it.

 

Chapter 14 has David making moves to solidify Jerusalem as the focal point – the capital – of Israel. Hiram, the Gentile king of Tyre sent cedars, masons, and carpenters to help build David’s palace. His family grew greatly in number, as well as his strength. God gave him victories over the Philistines, and his fame spread. The chronicler tells us in verse 17 that “the Lord brought the fear of him upon all nations.” Under David, and with God’s blessing, the nation was becoming a real world power.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

1 Chronicles – The Annals of the Times

David bringing the Ark to Jerusalem

David bringing the Ark to Jerusalem

Like the Book of Samuel, 1 & 2 Chronicles were originally one book. The Hebrew title is “Dibre Hayyamim” (meaning “Events of the Times” or “Annals”), which can be assumed to have been abbreviated from “Sepher Dibre Hayyamim,” for “The Book of the Events of the Times.”  In the Septuagint, it is known as “Paraleipomena,” or “The Things Omitted,” suggesting information supplemental to The Books of Samuel and Kings. In fact, so much of the Scripture in the Books of Chronicles can be found in Kings that many people wonder why God would have wanted two such similar records.

There are a couple of very good answers to that question. As always, it is good to remember that any time we see something repeated in Scripture, it is a pretty good indication that it is important. Secondly, unlike Kings, the Books of Chronicles have little at all to say about the northern kingdom, but instead they are centered almost totally around Judah, or the southern kingdom. It is also argued that the perspective in the Chronicles is less from a historical viewpoint than it is for edification.

As an act of pride, King David forced Joab to take a census of men of military age. The Lord was displeased with David for this and sent a great plague.

As an act of pride, King David forced Joab to take a census of men of military age. The Lord was displeased with David for this and sent a great plague.

Jewish tradition holds that Ezra was the author, although there is nothing in the books to verify this. It was once believed that the Chronicles along with Ezra and Nehemiah were once one book, but most scholars now recognize them as separate works of approximately the same period. A post-exilic date of 450-400 BC for the Book seems to be validated by the mention of several descendants of David from the period in places such as 1 Chronicles 3:17-24.

The first nine chapters of 1 Chronicles are a lengthy list of genealogies that begin with Adam and conclude with that of the returning exiles. Such a long and tedious (to us) list provokes questions about the reason for them to be there at all.  In fact, they are important for more than one reason. First, it would be important to identify the Levites after returning from captivity in order to properly preserve the priesthood. Secondly, the proper heirs for the land could be identified for distribution to those returning to Jerusalem from captivity. Finally, it preserves the record of the lineage of David – important to validate the lineage of the Messiah.

Outline of 1 Chronicles

 /Bob’s boy

___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

2 Samuel 6 – The Ark Brought to Jerusalem

The story of the ark being brought to Jerusalem is told here, and the first attempt does not go well.  The ark was one of the “holy things,” with which they communed with the Lord – but though the Levite priests.  The detail given by the Lord for its construction was exquisite (Exodus 25:10-22, and Exodus 37:1-9).  The Koathites were to carry it – by poles through the rings.  Even they could not touch it, or they would die (Numbers 4:4-15).  None but the priests themselves could touch the holy things, as God had set the Levites apart (consecrated) for himself.

The Chastisement of Uzzah

The Chastisement of Uzzah (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

But they set out to bring it to Jerusalem on a cart, much as the manner in which the Philistines returned it in 1 Samuel 6:7.  The oxen stumbled, and Uzzah reached out to take hold of it (the right thing to do, one might think). But as we have learned, when God says He will do something, He always does it.  God keeps ALL of His promises!  David and those transporting the Ark showed no respect for the Lord, and Uzzah was now dead because of his sin.

Three months pass after this incident (verse 11) before David again transports it.  This second attempt is mentioned briefly here, but in more detail in 1 Chronicles 15, as this story is told there again. As our reading has shown before, when God says something more than once, we should pay attention!  This time, the Levites carry it to Jerusalem properly.

Michal’s disdain and David’s rejection of her afterward is important to us because she will not bear him a child – Saul’s line will not be extended through the house of David.  Contrary to the picture some have painted, David was not dancing naked, but wearing a linen ephod – a simple garment as the priests wore (verse 14, and 1 Chronicles 15:27).  He had taken off his kingly robes to honor the Lord (verse 21).

When Jesus laid down His life for us and the temple curtain was torn (Matthew 27:51), Jesus became like our “ark”, just as He is our Priest, through which we can approach the Father (Hebrews 5:1-10).  Do we honor and respect this most holy and precious son of our Lord, whose very name is even used today by many to casually swear?

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.