Communion and Preparation – Luke 22

As Jesus and his disciples reclined at table to eat the Passover, he told them how much he had looked forward to having this opportunity- his truly last until “it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God” – after his resurrection. He took the cup of the fruit of the vine and the bread, and He had them divide it between them. Note that He gave thanks for the bread and the fruit of the vine separately before doing so, just as is our custom in observing this Lord’s supper which he instituted here.

The Last Supper

The Last Supper (Photo credit: elmas156)

After he explained to them the meaning that these elements now had – his body and his blood, they ate. It was then that he broke the news to them that one of those who were present would betray him. He said that the fact that he was going to go was already determined. But He  told them that it would not go well for the one who betrayed him. This got their attention, and they questioned each other, trying to determine who it was.

Then an odd dispute came up – odd in light of the news that Jesus had just given them. The dispute was over which one of them would be the greatest in Jesus’ kingdom. This goes to show that it still just wasn’t sinking in. It reminds us of the third time that Jesus foretold His death to them in Luke 18:34. The scripture said “this saying was hidden from them, and they did not grasp what was said. It seems clear that they still were not “grasping” it. They were still imagining that Jesus was to become the earthly king of the Jews, and that they were wondering just how high on the “totem pole” each of them was going to be.

So then Jesus turned upside down their notions of greatness and leadership completely. He pointed out that He is one among them who serves. Luke does not recount here the lesson that Jesus taught them about serving when He washed their feet, as John detailed in John 13:12-15. But it is clear that at this point He had given it to them. He also told them that those who would be the “greatest” must become as the youngest – that is, those who were more often traditionally called to serve others. Yet he said that He assigns to them – those who were with Him thru His trials – a place at his table in his kingdom. They just still do not know what “the kingdom” really will mean at this point.

Then Jesus’ conversation turns to Peter, and that deserves some attention. Note verses 31-32:

31 “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat, 32 but I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned again, strengthen your brothers.”

Judas at the Last Supper

Judas at the Last Supper (Photo credit: Lawrence OP)

It is significant that the word translated as you twice in verse 31 is plural. So the verse is emphasizing Satan’s determination to shake the faith of all of the apostles. In verse 32, the word is plural, as Jesus is addressing Peter. Jesus knew by now that Judas was lost, and he knew that Peter was Satan’s next target. But He says, that He has prayed that Peter’s faith would not fail. He knew that the Holy Spirit would fill Peter at the proper time, and that he would strengthen the others. Peter, of course, said he was ready to go to prison or die, but Jesus told him of his coming denial.

He then reminds them of when he sent them out without a moneybag or knapsack (Luke 9:1-6), and asks if they lacked for anything. They answered that they had not. Then he told them:

“But now let the one who has a moneybag take it, and likewise a knapsack. And let the one who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one.

This passage generates much debate. Some see the sword as having a figurative meaning – as in arming themselves for spreading the gospel. But if that were the case, wouldn’t the moneybag and knapsack also be figurative? But how else to explain it? Jesus obviously did not want them to use these swords against the authorities when they came to arrest him. But note that when Peter does cut the ear from one of them when they come to arrest Jesus, Jesus rebukes him – but he does not have him get rid of the sword either.

The most reasonable explanation is that Jesus knows that their lives are about to change. They were safe as long as they were all together with him. But many would scatter and become separated. They would need their moneybags, their knapsacks, and they would need their swords for protection against robbers, and maybe even wild animals. Remember, they weren’t checking into La Quinta on their travels, and seldom were lucky enough to be taken into someone’s home.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 2 Chronicles here

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

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Down For the Count – 1 Chronicles 21

This chapter begins with Satan inciting David to number Israel. The parallel account in 2 Samuel 24 reads “the anger of the Lord was kindled against Israel, and he incited David against them.” Obviously, God in His anger with the Israelites allowed Satan to do this, but He did not Himself authorize or initiate it. Otherwise, He would have no reason to be angry about it.

Gustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, the antagoni...

Gustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, the antagonist of John Milton’s Paradise Lost c. 1866 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is unclear why the act of taking this census was sinful and angered God. In all other cases, the census was taken at God’s command for a specific purpose God had in mind.  Perhaps this unauthorized census came from a heart filled with the pride of life and an unworthy heart on David’s part. At any rate, Joab knew that it was wrong because he asked David “why should it (the census) be a cause of guilt for Israel?”

God was displeased, and David was quick to repent. But God gave him his choice of punishments for the people. Three years of famine, three months of “devastation” by foes, or three days of pestilence, with the angel of the Lord causing destruction throughout the land. David, saying that he would rather be at the mercy of God than of man, chose the latter. 70,0000 men died in the pestilence, but God stayed the hand of the angel before it destroyed Jerusalem. David and the elders gazed upon the visage of the angel and fell on their faces.

At the behest of the angel, David went to Ornan the Jebusite to build an altar on his threshing floor. Ornan offered to give David the animals for sacrifice for free, but David would not make a sacrifice to God that cost him nothing. So he paid Ornan, and he saw that God would accept his sacrifice there. He was grateful for that because “the tabernacle of the Lord, which Moses had made in the wilderness, and the altar of burnt offering were at that time in the high place at Gibeon.” David did not want to go there because he was afraid of the sword of the angel. Sometimes fearing the Lord can mean just that.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Who Is Beelzebul? – (Luke 11)

The subject of demons in the New Testament scriptures is one that tends to make us uncomfortable for many reasons. Not the least of those is that the subject is possibly more difficult to defend to an unbeliever than that of the other miracles that Jesus and His apostles performed. We tend to feel more comfortable even with the discussion of resurrection from the dead than with one centered around demon possession in the NT. We have addressed that fact here in this previous post, and there is an excellent article that deals extensively with the subject at ApologeticsPress.org. But it was a fact of life in the time around the first century, and make no mistake – the Bible does not confuse the condition with any sort of disease. We believe that such happenings ended with the age of the Apostles, as did miracles. Having said that, there is much that we do not know about the subject, and we would not care to open any doors to personal knowledge (tongue not so firmly planted in cheek).

English: ELIYAH VISITS KING AHAB AND THE BA'AL...

English: ELIYAH VISITS KING AHAB AND THE BA’AL PROPHETS 1 MELAKIM 21 KINGS (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verse 14, Jesus casts out a demon that was causing a man to be mute – one of the many ways that they afflicted people. Some praised him and others said that he did this “by Beelzebul, prince of demons.”Your version may have the name as the more familiar “Beelzebub.” But where did this name come from?

It is probably an intentional, mocking Hebrew corruption of the name for the Canaanite God “Baal-zebul” (there were many Baals, not just one), which meant “god of the height, or high dwelling.” It is first mentioned in 1 Kings 2:2-3 by the Baal-worshiping son of king Ahab, Ahaziah. The name used here in Luke translates to “lord of the dunghill” or “lord of the flies” (yes, that was the title to the novel by William Golding).

The Jews had adapted this insulting name for the Baal god into another name for Satan. Some have said that the name’s association with the devil had been taken from the “Testament of Solomon” (not to be confused with the Old Testament book, “Song of Solomon”). But that non-inspired secular writing is traceable to the 1st or 2nd century A.D., more than 1,000 years after Solomon’s reign. But Beelzebul was used by the Jews as a name for Satan long before someone tried in vain to pass that literature off as God’s word. This was perhaps the most grievous accusation the Pharisees made against the Lord.

Jesus pointed out the illogical nature of their accusation by stating that if Satan was giving Him the power to cast out demons, He was fighting against himself; and a house (or kingdom) divided against itself cannot stand (no, that phrase was not original with Lincoln 🙂 ). We really like how Jesus finishes his answer, letting them know in no uncertain terms that He is mightier than Satan:

“When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe; but when one stronger than he attacks him and overcomes him, he takes away his armor in which he trusted and divides his spoil. Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.”

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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A Man, the Son of God – (Luke 10)

Jesus' disciples followed Him wherever he went, listening to Him and learning from Him. When He returned to heaven, they would lead the building of His church.

Jesus’ disciples followed Him wherever he went, listening to Him and learning from Him. When He returned to heaven, they would lead the building of His church.

In this part of the chapter, we get to see a side of Jesus that we rarely are privileged to see – and so do the disciples! We see here a very real and human connection with these excited disciples. The seventy (or seventy-two) return from the mission Jesus had sent them on, “filled with joy.” They excitedly told Jesus how they had even had authority over demons they had encountered among the people. Jesus states that He “saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.”

It is unknown to us whether Jesus saw something in a vision while the seventy were about their work, but clearly He knew that what they were doing had diminished Satan’s power on earth. For His own reasons, God had allowed these demons to have much power over people in the time leading up to Jesus’ ministry. But this is the turning point. There would still be demon possessions during the apostolic age, but they would become much fewer in number as the lives on earth of the twelve came to an end. There is much we do not know about this subject, and there has been much speculation. But we must trust that God has told us what is important for us to know about it for now.

Jesus acknowledges the authority He has given them, and promises that nothing will hurt them (verse 19). But He stresses that what is important is the place they will have in heaven. But Jesus is obviously excited as well, and verse 21 says hat he “rejoiced in the Holy Spirit.” In His prayer to God, He praises Him for revealing these things that the disciples have seen to them instead of “the wise and understanding.” These were common ordinary people from all walks of life, yet God had seen fit to reveal to them what no others would see.

Elijah put his mantle or cloak on Elisha, showing him that he would succeed Elijah in his prophetic work (1 Kings 19:19-21)

Elijah put his mantle or cloak on Elisha, showing him that he would succeed Elijah in his prophetic work (1 Kings 19:19-21)

Jesus then turns to them and tells them that very thing – that they were blessed to see and hear what any of the prophets would have loved to have the privilege of witnessing. But none had that privilege. That blessing had been saved for these “children.” Jesus told His apostles in chapter 9 that he who is least will be great. Not one of us should think that we are not as important as others in His kingdom.

Christians must use the talents that each one has to do the most good for others that we can do. The elderly couple who visits the sick…the soccer Mom who cooks meals for shut-ins..the woman who teaches preschoolers Bible class…and those who send cards of encouragement or sympathy to their brothers and sisters. All of these are just as important as one who serves as a missionary in a foreign land.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

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The Tempting of Jesus

As Luke chapter four opens, Jesus is just returning from the Jordan River and His baptism, filled with the Holy Spirit. And it was the Spirit, Luke tells us, that led Him into the wilderness for 40 days, where He was tempted by the devil. The 40 days reminds us of the 40 days that Moses went without food in Exodus 34:28, as well as the 40 years that the Israelites spent wandering in the desert before entering the Promised Land (Numbers 14:34). The parallel with this latter seems significant. God provided manna for them daily, teaching them dependence on Him. The Spirit, it would seem, was leading Jesus to depend on faith that God would provide for Him. It was this faith that the devil was determined to derail.

There are those who have expressed the opinion that Jesus could not truly have sinned, since He was the Son of God. This opinion refers to what is called peccability,” from the Latin verb “peccare” – meaning to sin. If He had not been able to sin, there would have been no real temptation. But we know this to be false, as the Hebrew writer tells us in Hebrews 4:14-16.

The Temptation of Christ (detail)

The Temptation of Christ (detail) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John the baptist had indeed prepared the way for Him, and God knew that Jesus needed these tests. This was a great opportunity for Satan because he knew that Jesus’ ministry was about to begin. His hunger and weakness was very real after 40 days in the wilderness. The temptation to deviate from the Spirit’s direction and satisfy His own hunger would be great. Then Satan showed Jesus a large portion of what must have been the Roman Empire (the “kingdoms of the world” in verse 5) that could be under his authority if he would simply bow down to him. The last temptation would have made Jesus famous throughout the land, and nobody would have been able to doubt His greatness after throwing Himself down from the Temple. And after all, would God really allow harm to come to Him?

One of the lessons we can learn from these temptations that Jesus was able to overcome can be seen by looking at how Jesus answered the devil. In each case, he used the Scriptures to answer (Deuteronomy 8:3, Deuteronomy 6:13, and Deuteronomy 6:16). Jesus showed us that our best defense against temptations is a thorough knowledge of God’s word. By reading and studying the Bible, we come closer to God, and His word gives us the answers – the knowledge and understanding to get through the trials of this world.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.

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Psalm 108 – With God We Shall Do Valiantly

With few variances, most of Psalm 108 can be found in two other psalms. The first 5 verses are practically identical to Psalm 57:7-11. The last eight verses are almost identical to Psalm 60:5-12. So why the combination here repeated? As always, whenever God’s word contains passages that are repeated from another passage, it is a sure sign that they are very important.

David hid in one of the many caves near Adullam, a city 13 miles southwest of Bethlehem (1 Samuel 22: 1-12). David was in this area when three of his mighty men risked their lives to get him a drink of water from Bethlehem (2 Samuel 23: 13-17).

David hid in one of the many caves near Adullam, a city 13 miles southwest of Bethlehem (1 Samuel 22: 1-12). David was in this area when three of his mighty men risked their lives to get him a drink of water from Bethlehem (2 Samuel 23: 13-17).

The first five verses come from a psalm that we are fairly certain refers to David’s time when he had fled to a cave to escape from Saul’s murderous intentions. The coinciding verses are of praise to God for His love and faithfulness, written from the context of David’s thankfulness for being delivered. The last eight verses come from a psalm that appears to have been written on the heels of a great military defeat, in which the psalmist is entreating the Lord to again show His favor to His people.

The two parts were likely put together as a combination for a liturgical purpose during a time of great distress and unease concerning the future. Together, they remind God’s people of His matchless mercy and the care for which He regards His people. They make an outstanding unified plea for God’s help in the fight against “the foe” (Satan). But most importantly, it reminds us first that we cannot fight this enemy alone, and secondly, that we do not have to fight alone, for God is with us.

for vain is the salvation of man!
With God we shall do valiantly;
it is he who will tread down our foes

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

Understanding the Cross of Christ – Part 4 – (God’s Plan)

This series began in Part One as a search for a more meaningful answer to an aspiring young Christian’s question: “Why did God send His only son to die?”  The short answer “to save us from our sins,” while correct, really only serves to raise more questions.  In part 2, we looked at what sin is, why it matters so much to God, and why it should matter to us.  In part 3, we delved into God’s response to sin.  In all of that discussion, we have made great mention of the fact that God has a plan for our salvation.  Now, in part 4, let us look at how Jesus really fits into that plan.

So how does Jesus fit into this plan of God’s?

If you were to say that Jesus, in fact, is God’s plan for our salvation, you would be correct.  God first promised this savior in Genesis 3:15, when sin first entered the world.  The verse reads in the ESV:

I will put enmity between you and the woman,
and between your offspring and her offspring;
he shall bruise your head,
and you shall bruise his heel.

The enmity that God refers to here is opposition to Satan through the offspring born of the woman.  Clearly, the “he” in the verse that will “bruise your head” is that offspring.  What is meant by bruising the head is the complete victory over the evil one that had the power over death, as told to us in Hebrews 2:14-15.  As for how the Crucifixion can be classified as  the bruising of the heel, consider that Jesus overcame death itself, and that the ultimate fate of Satan is his utter destruction (Revelation 20:10).

There are a great many prophecies throughout the Bible that promise the coming of this Messiah  – many more than we can include in this outline.  But the most important of these is arguably that which is written in 2 Samuel 7, where God makes a covenant with David which promises a kingdom from his offspring that will endure forever.  He would be the son of God (Psalm 2:7).  It is through this offspring of David that the one promised in Genesis 3 will come.  He would be sacrificed for our transgressions (Isaiah 53:5-12).  And most importantly, he would be risen from the dead (Psalm 16:10, Psalm 49:15).

Who was Jesus really, and where did He come from?

Let us begin with his name.  Most people know of Him as Jesus Christ.  He has been known this way for so long that many people actually assume that His last name – His surname – was Christ.  But that is, of course, not the case.  Over the years the reference to Him as Jesus the Christ has simply been shortened.  The Hebrew for Messiah and the Greek for Christ (Khristos) both mean anointed or “anointed one.”

Most people know that He was born in Bethlehem of a virgin, and many have wondered what the point is of the long genealogy written in Matthew 1:1-17.   This was to document the fact that Jesus’ birth came forth through the line of King David.  The names of many of those in that genealogical record are found in books of the Bible (the Old Testament) written in the inspired word of God over many hundreds of years.

But though Jesus was born of a woman, just as had been prophesied, that is not the entire significance of His origin.  In John 1:1-18, we are told that before He came to live as a man, Jesus was with God since the beginning of time:

“He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made.”

Some say that Jesus never claimed to be deity, but that is certainly not true.  In John 10:30, he told the Jewish leaders at the temple “I and the Father are one.”  And in John 8:58, he told them “before Abraham was, I am,” which was clearly a reference to the way God identified Himself to Moses in Exodus 3:14.

Paul, in his letter to the Philippians in Philippians 2:5-8, summed up how much Jesus gave up to come to Earth, to become a man, and to suffer a cruel death:

“Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.”

As we near the conclusion of this series, we will  examine how Jesus measures up with what the people were expecting from the Messiah that had been anticipated for well over a thousand years, what His death meant then and, more importantly, what it means to us now.

/Bob’s boy

___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Job 2 ( or Just When You Thought Things Were Bad Enough…)

"Job covered in boils" - from Martin Luther's Bible

“Job covered in boils” – from Martin Luther’s Bible

The opening of the second chapter of Job is exactly as written in Job 1:6-8.  These encounters between God and Satan, especially when one interjects the “sons of God,” are the subject of lots of varying interpretations among commentators; and trying to sort through those may well overwhelm you as much as it does this blogger.  Some see these “sons of God” as angels, and some see them as worshipers.  It is pointed out that in no part of the scriptures does it say that these events take place in heaven.  The righteous are said to come before the Lord every time we worship him.  It is also true that Jesus said that the angels see the face of God every day (Matthew 18:10), so they would hardly need to “present” themselves before Him.

Matthew Poole saw these encounters between God and Satan as parabolic, and it is also possible that he could be partially right about that.   But the question in the end is – Does it really matter?  Okay so here, admittedly, is one more opinion.  <Insert disclaimer here> The discourse between God and Satan is told in the word of God by His inspired writer, just as a prophet would tell us in a book that is both history and poetry.

The conversations between God and Satan in Job have three purposes in my view.  First, they tell us that Satan is a real adversary.  (“Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.” 1 Peter 5:8).   Secondly, they serve to demonstrate that although God does not cause us to suffer, it is not His will to prevent evil from be-falling us at all times.  Third,  they assure us that Satan’s power is not unlimited.  God does have dominion over him.

So Satan struck Job with “loathsome sores” (some versions say “boils”) literally from head to toe.  Attempts have been made to assign a medical condition using the description of the breath and other symptoms in other chapters.  But again, does it matter?  The point is that he was in so much agony that he was using broken pottery to “scrape” himself (verse 8).  And he was so disfigured that his three friends (Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, who we will get to know better) did not even recognize him, cried when they saw how bad he really was, and sat with him for a week without anyone even speaking.

The question of why Satan did not take the life of Job’s wife is answered in verse nine, as she tries to persuade Job to curse God, to give up, and to take his own life.

We will resume Job’s story next Thursday.  I think I need me some Psalms and Proverbs before then.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.