Psalm 106:24-48 – Glory In Your Praise

We pick up the second half of this historical psalm in verse 24, as the psalmist is recounting the history and the sins of the people of Israel. Verses 24-27 continue telling of the failings of the people in the desert as the Lord declares they will wander in the desert forty years, and fall there (Numbers 14:28-35).

Verses 28-31 continue with the great sin of the people in the Baal worship at Peor, and recount how Phinehas intervened and saved them from the plague that ensued (Numbers 25). This led to his family having the priesthood from generation to generation. Verse 32 continues with the story of the waters at Meribah and the sin of Moses there when he struck the rock (Numbers 20).

Jews Led Into Captivity

Jews Led Into Captivity

Verses 34-39 summarize how the people of Israel failed to drive all the Canaanites from their land, and ended up mixing with these nations. This led to their idol worship, just as had been predicted, even sinking to child sacrifice.  Verse 39 says that they “became unclean” and “played the whore in their deeds.”

Verses 40-46 then summarize the punishment of captivity that the judgment of the Lord brought to them. Verses 44-46 show God remembering his promise to Solomon when he heard their cry, and causing them to be pitied by their captors. The historical psalm has turned into a lament now, and the concluding verse indicates that their restoration is not yet realized – which is the plea of this psalm:

Save us, O Lord our God,
and gather us from among the nations,
that we may give thanks to your holy name
and glory in your praise.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Psalm 137 – By the Waters of Babylon

Destruction of Jerusalem under the Babylonian ...

Destruction of Jerusalem under the Babylonian rule. Illustration from the Nuremberg Chronicle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

This psalm is one that is often misunderstood. It is also one that skeptics and critics like to quote to “prove” that the Bible, of all things, is somehow evil (he says, rolling eyes toward heaven). Verses 1-3 make it clear – psalm 137 is obviously written either during the time of Babylonian captivity or just afterward, making it some time between 587 BC and 537 BC.

 

It is a lament for the destruction of Jerusalem, and for all that was lost in human life, in heritage, in freedom, and in dignity. It is lament of a people who were taken off forcibly and with certain ferocity, while others they knew – and loved – were killed violently.

 

What causes the misunderstanding – even among some of those scholars who are genuinely faithful – is verse 9. First it should be pointed out that the word that is translated “blessed” in some versions (here and in other parts of the Bible) is more accurately translated as “happy.” Secondly, verses 8-9 are not recounting what has happened, but they are a prediction of what will be.

 

“Happy shall he be who repays you with what you have done to us! Happy shall he be who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!” The third thing to remember is that the prediction in this passage is of what the Medes and the Persians are going to do to the Babylonians. God is not instructing them to do so (nor does He condone it), but His word accurately predicts what will happen – the same atrocities the Babylonians committed. And the invading soldiers in this prediction will be just as joyful in their cruel conquest as the Babylonians were.

 

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

Major Prophets (part 5) – Book of Daniel

English: Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego in the...

English: Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego in the Furnace (Dan. 3:23-24,91-98) Русский: Седрах, Мисах и Авденаго в раскалённой печи (Дан. 3:23-24,91-98) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 605 B.C., Nebuchadnezzar brought young men of noble heritage in Judah back for service in the king’s court. Daniel and his friends were part of one of these groups (Daniel 1:3). So his life in captivity was quite different from that of Ezekiel and many others less fortunate. According to Daniel 1:21, he served there until the first year of the reign of Cyrus, which would be about 538 B.C.

Daniel is a very important book in the Old Testament. It contains much prophecy that was fulfilled with undeniable accuracy (critics and skeptics notwithstanding). As has always been the case, even disputed passages have held up under the test of time (take, for example, Daniel’s use of the name Belshazzar in Daniel 5). It also teaches through Daniel’s life and that of his friends, Shadrach, Meshach,, and Abednego, a great deal about living faithfully under very great adversity. Finally, and most importantly, it teaches us much about the power of God, and His faithfulness to His word.

Daniel's Answer to the King

Daniel’s Answer to the King (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The fulfilled prophecies from the Book of Daniel are a great source of assurance to believers for their accuracy. Skeptics and critics, as is always the case, dispute much concerning them of course. But they too have stood the test of time. A detailed account and analysis of all of these in one blog would be an exercise in futility. But for some great analysis of two of them, as well as answers for critics, take a look at this article from Apologetics Press concerning Daniel 2, and this article concerning prophecies in Daniel 8.

Belshazzar's Feast depicts a vision described ...

Belshazzar’s Feast depicts a vision described in the biblical Book of Daniel. –31&src= Daniel 5:1–31 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Summary

/Bob’s boy
___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.