Fire On the Earth – Not Peace! – (Luke 12)

English: Northwest Crown Fire Experiment, Nort...

English: Northwest Crown Fire Experiment, Northwest Territories, Canada Français : Feu de forêt expérimental (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Verse 49 is just not easy to understand. It’s true. Incredibly, today yours truly read six largely different viewpoints from six commentators on that verse! The verse reads (in the ESV) “I came to cast fire on the earth, and would that it were already kindled!” And it is one of those that could possibly have a double meaning. But I don’t think so. I believe that what Jesus meant here is that the fire He came to start was the message of salvation, preaching Jesus Christ crucified, and that this fire (also lit aflame in the hearts of men and women) would spread throughout the world. And He wishes that it would begin already.

Now admittedly, He had not yet been crucified when He spoke those words. But notice in the next verse he said “I have a baptism to be baptized with, and how great is my distress until it is accomplished!” Of course, there is not total agreement on what this verse means. But for the most part, scholars interpret this as referring to his death, burial, and resurrection. The phrase “how great is my distress until it is accomplished” likely means two things – He wants to have it over with, and He certainly dreads it (He will prove that to be true soon in the garden at Gethsemane).

Newborn Portrait Session

Newborn Portrait Session (Photo credit: kristaguenin)

Beginning in verse 51, Jesus then talks about the differences that many families would have with the gospel. He said “Do you think that I have come to give peace on earth? No, I tell you, but rather division…father against son and son against father, mother against daughter…” Today, perhaps more than ever in recent history, we see that very thing happening in families all over. Families are not converted or saved together, for the most part. Salvation comes to individuals, and often there is division among the family members concerning the Lord. Sometimes, those divisions even becomes bitterness toward each other.

In verses 54-56, Jesus speaks especially to that present generation. They have learned to predict the weather, but they cannot see the truth standing right in front of them – that the Messiah they have longed for has come. Verses 57-59 are good advice for anyone in a legal matter. Try to settle it with your adversary before (and even instead of) letting it go to court. But it is better advice for those who want to be saved. Seek forgiveness, as God has made it supremely possible, rather than facing God on the day of judgment.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Forgiveness Freely Given – (Luke 12)

As Luke 12 opens, Jesus has just left the dinner with the Pharisees at the end of chapter 11, and he tells His disciples to beware the leaven of the Pharisees. This refers not only to their hypocrisy, but to their teachings and influence as well. But He is warning them (and us) against hypocrisy and the damage it can do to their reputations and the church He is building in verses 2-3 when He says:

“Nothing is covered up that will not be revealed, or hidden that will not be known. Therefore whatever you have said in the dark shall be heard in the light, and what you have whispered in private rooms shall be proclaimed on the housetops.”

Jesus then tells them not to fear those that kill the body. This is a very real and relevant admonition, and He knows that His apostles will all find themselves in positions for that sort of fear to be a real threat. But the One He says they should fear is God, who can cast into hell. He emphasizes God’s omnipotence by pointing out how cheap five sparrows can be bought – yet not one of them is forgotten by God, who even numbers the hairs on your head.

The Holy Spirit depicted as a dove, surrounded...

The Holy Spirit depicted as a dove, surrounded by angels, by Giaquinto, 1750s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 8-12, Jesus is preparing His disciples for “the good, the bad, and the ugly” of what they will encounter in spreading the gospel. Those that acknowledge Him before men will be acknowledged by Jesus before God. Those who deny Him, will be denied before God. Anyone who speaks a word against Him will be forgiven. But he who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven (found also in Matthew 12:31-32).

It is important to understand what is being said here. Many people have believed that because they have said something irreverent about the Holy Spirit, they can never be forgiven, and are thus condemned. The very fact that they fear that to be true proves that it is false! This is best explained by a couple of quotes from Burton Coffman and Anthony Lee Ash. Coffman said:

“The three dispensations of God’s grace are in view here. Blaspheming
God in the patriarchal period, or Christ as the culmination of the
Mosaic period, or the Holy Spirit in the age of the gospel were in the
ascending order of seriousness. “The Holy Spirit with his teachings is
the last that God has to offer man; and, if one blasphemes the Holy
Spirit by rejecting the New Testament, there is no chance for
forgiveness.”

Perhaps better stated by Ash, who said:

“One could reject Jesus during his personal ministry and still accept him by accepting Spirit-inspired preaching. But reject the latter and there would be no further overture from God”

It is the rejection of the Holy Spirit that makes forgiveness impossible, for without accepting this gift, there is no way for the heart to be opened to God’s word and the truth. The fact is that forgiveness is freely given to all those who desire to do the will of God.

Verses 11-12 were for his disciples. Notice that He says “When…” not “If…” “they bring you before the synagogues and the rulers and the authorities, do not be anxious about how you should defend yourself or what you should say, for the Holy Spirit will teach you in that very hour what you ought to say.”

Jesus knew this was going to happen to them. He did everything He could to prepare them for every eventuality because He knew what they would face.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Parable or Practicality? – (Luke 11)

Verses 24-26 come on the heels of Jesus casting out a demon from a man. Nevertheless, this passage, taken as it is, seems completely out-of-place here. One might even wonder why it was even included. Really, how could such information be useful, even to one who had been possessed? The verses speak of an unclean spirit that “goes out” of the subject, and then returns with seven more that are even more evil after the house is swept and placed in order, leaving the subject worse than before. Undoubtedly, the things he speaks of were true of certain demons that afflicted people in the first century. But still, what is the point?

The Pharisees Question Jesus

The Pharisees Question Jesus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As is always the case with scripture, context is everything. But let’s first look at the same content, as told in Matthew 12:43-45. Much of Matthew’s gospel was written topically, but that only serves to make context more relevant. In Matthew 12:41-42, Jesus speaks of how Nineveh will rise up on the day of judgment condemning “this generation” (meaning the Jews of His time). Then He says the same about the queen of the south (an obvious reference to the queen of Sheba) who came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, “and behold, one greater than Solomon is here.”

Piero della Francesca: Legend of the True Cros...

Piero della Francesca: Legend of the True Cross – the Queen of Sheba Meeting with Solomon , Detail. (c. 1452-66, Fresco, San Francesco, Arezzo, Italy) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Then at the end of the passage in Matthew about the 8 spirits, Jesus said So also will it be with this evil generation.” So clearly, the story of the unclean spirits is intended as a parable. And we see the same thing looking closely at Luke. He has already made it clear that “the kingdom of God has come upon you” (verse 20). And after telling the Pharisees in verses 21-22 (in so many words) that He is mightier than Satan, He says “whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.”

Burton Coffman made an analysis of the parable of the unclean spirits that we feel is pretty close to the mark. We will close with that analysis below, with our own comments in bold:

“The man in whom the evil spirit was = Israel.” Agreed
“The going out of the demon = the rebirth of the nation under the preaching of John the Baptist.” Partly agree – could refer also to Israel since the time after Ezra and Nehemiah, when idolatry finally was under control.
“The swept and garnished period = the emptiness of Israel’s inadequate regeneration. No meaningful change in the people occurred.” Agreed
“The restlessness of the demon = the relentless and unresting hostility against Jesus of the evil powers.” Agreed – hostility and rejection
“His repossession of the victim = total repossession of national Israel by Satan’s evil forces. This refers to the judicial hardening of Israel.” Leaving him in worse condition than before would also seem to refer to the coming judgment of A.D. 70 that looms over them after the crucifixion (Hence, the “Oh Jerusalem” lament of Matthew 23:37-39)

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Good Gifts – (Luke 11)

This chapter begins with one of the many occasions when the gospel writers record that Jesus was praying. When he had finished, one of His disciples asked Him to teach them to pray “as John taught his disciples.” The example Jesus then gave them was an abbreviated version of what we have come to know as “the Lord’s Prayer,” found in Matthew 6:9-13. This is, however, a different occasion and a slightly different prayer. It is not a commandment to pray by rote, any more than that prayer in the famous Sermon on the Mount. But it does serve as a model for making reverent supplication.

The Lord's Prayer (1886-1896) from the series ...

The Lord’s Prayer (1886-1896) from the series The Life of Christ, Brooklyn Museum (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The example that Jesus gives of the persistent neighbor knocking on the man’s door at midnight often leads people to the conclusion that we sometimes have to just keep “bugging” God in prayer, and finally he will give in and let us have what we want.  But is that really what Jesus is telling us here? Please do not misunderstand. We are not saying that there is no value in persistent prayer. A good case can be made for the opposite, in fact, by reading the parable in Luke 18:1-8 and other passages such as Colossians 4:2, and Psalm 88:1.

But let’s look at the context of this passage. Jesus has just given an example of how to pray to our heavenly Father. Then he asks the people which of them has a friend that they would go to in the middle of the night for food for a traveling friend. Keep in mind that most families would be sleeping in the same room of a house in those times. What an inconvenience – especially for those with small children! The friend might very well call out for them to go away, but may give in – not out of friendship, but because of persistence. The friend may want to give them what they need to make them go away.

But the relationship we have with God is not like that of a friend. It is more like a father. God wants to give His children good gifts – especially those of the Holy Spirit.  That does not mean that He will give us anything we ask for. God is too wise for that. He knows what our needs are, and He will give us what we need. Sometimes that may be different from what we think that we want, however. A father whose child asks for an egg will not give him a scorpion, the text says. God knows how to give us gifts according to our needs. What He gives us, even if different from what we ask for, will be what we need.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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An International Incident – 1 Chronicles 19-20

Landscape with David and Bathsheba

Landscape with David and Bathsheba (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most of the events of these two chapters are contained in chapters 10-11 of 2 Samuel, but there are some differences. Most conspicuously absent here is any reference to David’s sin with Bathsheba. This affair and betrayal of Uriah the Hittite took place at the time that “Joab led out the army and ravaged the country of the Ammonites and came and besieged Rabbah” (1 Chronicles 20:1).

Most scholars agree that the account is not left out simply to avoid showing David in a bad light. There are several things that demonstrate David’s goodness which the chronicler did not write about either. But the purpose of the chronicles was to preserve the knowledge (for the returning exiles and their descendants) of God’s covenant with David and reassure them that it was still a promise from God.

As chapter 19 opens, David sends messengers to give his condolences to  Hanun the son of Nahash the Ammonite because Nashash had “dealt kindly” with him. It is unknown what kindness that was. But Hanun, suspecting David’s motives and thinking his servants were spies, he shaved them and cut there clothes off at the hip, sending them on their way. After realizing the seriousness of the international incident he had created, Hanun hired chariots and horsemen from Mesopotamia and surrounding areas and kingdoms in a futile attempt to defeat David’s army.

English: The young Hebrew David hoists the hea...

English: The young Hebrew David hoists the head of the Philistine Goliath (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Joab “struck down Rabbah,” David accumulated much gold and other precious plunder – including a crown of gold that was taken from the king’s head. Verse 3 of chapter 20 says that they did the same to all of cities of the Ammonites. Then in verses 4-8, came the defeat of many Philistines, some of which were giants on the order of the Goliath that David killed when Saul was king. The Goliath here is not the same one, obviously.

The one mentioned in verse 6 with the extra digits had a condition called polydactyly, a condition that a small percentage of people are born with to this day – including yours truly (mine was an extra thumb). The man that holds the world record for the most digits is Akshat Saxena in India. He was born in 2010 with 7 digits on each hand and 10 digits on each foot, for a total of 34 digits!

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Who Then Is This? – (Luke 8)

In verse 22, Jesus has boarded a boat to go to “the other side of the lake.” That lake, of course, was the Sea of Galilee. Here Luke tells us that Jesus had fallen asleep, significant to us as a reminder that He was indeed a man. And as a man, He experienced fatigue, just as we do, and He did not hesitate to rest when He needed it – just as we must take time to do, when we can.

From Capernaum, Jesus and his disciples crossed the Sea of Galilee. A storm blew up unexpectedly, but Jesus calmed it. Landing in the region of the Gerasenes, Jesus sent demons out of a man and into a herd of pigs that plunged over a steep bank into the lake.

From Capernaum, Jesus and his disciples crossed the Sea of Galilee. A storm blew up unexpectedly, but Jesus calmed it. Landing in the region of the Gerasenes, Jesus sent demons out of a man and into a herd of pigs that plunged over a steep bank into the lake.

While He was sleeping, a storm came that was severe enough to begin to fill the vessel with water. Verse 23 confirms the severity, saying that they were indeed in danger. But Jesus remained asleep through it all, demonstrating that He must truly have been exhausted. When they woke him, they were frantic, letting Him know that they were about to die (verse 24). With His verbal command, the winds and the waves calmed, and He asked them where their faith was. The statement “who then is this, that he commands even winds and water, and they obey him?” betrays the fact that they really did not know for sure just who Jesus was yet.

From there, verse 26 says that they sailed to the country of the “Gerasenes” (some manuscripts have it as “Gadarenes”). This is the region around what was known as Gadara, which today is known as Umm Qais, just to the southeast of the Sea of Galilee. Here, Jesus met up with Legion (so-called because he had been possessed by many demons). He wore no clothes, and lived among the tombs. Verse 28 states that at various times, he had been bound and shackled, and placed under guard. But he would escape, and the demons would “drive him into the desert.”

Jesus commanded the demons out, and he cried out and fell down before him and said with a loud voice, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I beg you, do not torment me.” The demons begged him not cast them “into the abyss,” but to let them enter a herd of pigs that was on the hill. He gave them permission, and after they did, the herd rushed into the lake and drowned.

Christ at Gadara.

Christ at Gadara.

We have commented about such events as these in this age before in this previous post. These accounts are sometimes the source of embarrassment for the believer, and one of scoffing and derision for the unbeliever. But for whatever reason (some we covered in said article) God allowed these things to occur in the age just prior to Jesus’ birth, and into the apostolic age. We will cover this again at a later date. Suffice to say, there is much we do not know about the world of demons. But make no mistake, these were very real events.

The grateful man wanted to come with Jesus, but Jesus sent him away to “declare how much God has done for you,” which he did. The people of the region, however, were not so grateful, but full of fear because of Jesus; and they asked Him to leave. Jesus did depart in a boat, which serves as a lesson to us that if we do not want Him in our lives, He will, (and I am sure, does) accommodate us in that respect.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Confrontation With Tradition

Chapter 6 of Luke contains a couple of the most misapplied and often misunderstood passages in the New Testament. The first comes in verses 1-5, where on a Sabbath, Jesus and his disciples were going through a field, and the disciples plucked and ate some heads of grain. Deuteronomy 23:25 clearly states specifically that this practice is allowed. But the Pharisees had made their own rules up concerning even the smallest of matters; and they had decided that the act of doing this fell into the category of “work,” which was forbidden on the Sabbath.

Jesus' disciples plucked and ate some heads of grain in a grainfield, but were chastized by the Pharisees for doing this on the Sabbath (Matthew 12:1-8; Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5)

Jesus’ disciples plucked and ate some heads of grain in a grainfield, but were chastized by the Pharisees for doing this on the Sabbath (Matthew 12:1-8; Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5)

When they confront Jesus, asking why his disciples do what is “unlawful” on the Sabbath, Jesus gives an answer, apparently without denying (at least in the Scripture) any wrong-doing. In His answer, He points them to how David and his men ate the “bread of the Presence” which was unlawful for any but the priests to eat (1 Samuel 21:1-6). The argument by critics and skeptics alike, is that here Jesus endorses “situation ethics.” This is the notion that there is no absolute right or wrong where human needs are concerned – that David and his men were guiltless because of David’s supposed authority and/or the situation that they are in.

This idea is just plain wrong. To begin with, Jesus stated plainly in verse 4 that what David did “is not lawful for any but the priests.” What Jesus did by bringing this up was to point out that David, whom they revered (and whom they would not dare to condemn) had indeed broken the law. Jesus’ disciples were guiltless of breaking any Mosaic law – only the man-made regulations that the Pharisees had imposed on top of, and without authority from, God’s law. Yet they were condemning His disciples. The Pharisees had appointed themselves as “rulers” of the Sabbath, but Jesus pointed out that it was He who was “lord of the Sabbath.”  In the Gospel of Luke, this is the beginning of the more disagreeable encounters with the Pharisees that was sure to make them angry with Jesus.

Verse 6 begins another encounter with the Pharisees that would serve to fan those flames. On another Sabbath, Jesus was teaching in the synagogue. A man was there with a withered hand, and the Pharisees and scribes were watching to see if Jesus would heal Him – so that they could “accuse Him” for working on the Sabbath, thereby violating Mosaic law. It is remarkable that these men could know that Jesus had the power to heal something as definitive as a physical deformity, yet not believe in Him as the Messiah. We can only surmise that they had no desire to believe, but instead wanted to make others believe his power was from evil.

Jesus, of course, knew their thoughts, and he invited the confrontation by telling the man to come to Him. Then, he looked at the group of Pharisees and asked “is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to destroy it?” No answer to this question was recorded, so we can assume they gave none. But when he healed the man’s deformity, their anger was certainly kindled, as verse 11 states that they “discussed with one another what they might do to Jesus.”

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Luke 6 – Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath

Verses 1-5 have been used to link Biblical teaching to situation ethics, but this comes from a lack of understanding of the scriptures.  The disciples in verse 1 plucked and ate the grain with their hands, not with a sickle.  This was expressly allowed in the Law given in Deuteronomy 23:24-25.  But the Pharisees had made their own interpretation and decided it was the law, rather than God’s word.  Jesus challenged them to speak against David and his men eating the Bread of the Presence, or shewbread (1 Samuel 21:1-6) – which He said in verse 4 was unlawful.  He settles the matter in verse 5, saying that He is “lord of the Sabbath,”  with the unstated conclusion that the Pharisees are not.

English: A dispute with the pharisees. Passeri...

English: A dispute with the pharisees. Passeri. In the Bowyer Bible in Bolton Museum, England. Print 4384. From “An Illustrated Commentary on the Gospel of Mark” by Phillip Medhurst. Section D. Jesus confronts uncleanness. Mark 1:21-45, 2:1-12, 5:1-20, 25-34, 7:24-30. http://pdfcast.org/pdf/an-illustrated-commentary-by-phillip-medhurst-on-the-gospel-of-mark-section-d (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Verses 6-11 are another Sabbath encounter with the Pharisees, as Jesus was teaching in the synagogue.  Knowing that they are waiting to see if He will heal the man with the withered hand, He poses the question of whether it was lawful to do harm or to do good on the Sabbath.  They would not answer, but when he healed the man, they were angry.  Notice that their malice and desire to do harm to Him blinds them to the fact that the miracles prove He is the son of God.

In verses 12-16, after spending all night in prayer, He chose the twelve apostles from his disciples.   Verses 17-19 show the magnitude of the vast amounts of people He ministers to in the rest of this chapter.  People from Tyre and Sidon would almost certainly be Gentiles.

Some believe that the rest of this chapter is just Luke’s account of the Sermon on the Mount, but we must realize that similar sermons by the Lord would be taught at different times and to different crowds.  Note that in verse 17, after having spent the night praying on the mountain, He “he came down with them and stood on a level place.”  This has resulted in people referring to this as the Sermon on the Plain.  In comparing the “blessed” and the “woes” in this sermon, Jesus is not saying that it is wrong to be rich or that the poor are more righteous.  He is stating the poor and those less fortunate who are in His kingdom will have their reward, while those who may be rich but not part of the faithful already have their reward.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.