Job 12 – Job Replies: The Lord Has Done This

Verse 2 (“No doubt you are the people, and wisdom will die with you”), rather than being flattery, is obvious sarcasm on Job’s part concerning his wise friends.  He already knows, he tells them, about God’s great power and goodness; and he tells them in verse 3 that “I am not inferior to you.”   Job seems to have had enough of their self-righteous speeches about their supposed insight into the wisdom of the ages and the wisdom of God Himself.

whale-001Concerning Job’s description of his treatment by his neighbors in verses 4-5, Coffman comments “he truly spoke of a universal trait of our fallen human nature, namely, that of despising the unfortunate.”  He again disputes his friends’ assertions in verse 6 by pointing out that thieves and other ungodly people do enjoy peace and prosperity.

He then points them toward the animal kingdom, nature, and even the rest of mankind.  Gentle creatures, lush forests, and righteous men are not favored by God with abundance over predators, weeds, or evil dictators. Princes, kings, and even great nations can rise quickly and just as easily fall.  God, Job points out, controls all nature and everything on the earth.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Psalm 22 – Why Have You Forsaken Me?

And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”  Matthew 27:44

From Halley’s Handbook of the Bible (Halley, Henry H., Zondervan, 1961)

The Crucifixion, seen from the Cross, by James...

The Crucifixion, seen from the Cross, by James Tissot, 19th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“This sounds like a cry of anguish from David, but though written a thousand years before Jesus, it is so vivid a description of the crucifixion of Jesus that one would think of the writer as being personally present at the Cross. Jesus’ dying words (Psalms 22:1 Matthew 27:44), the sneers of his enemies (Psalms 22:7-8, Matthew 27:39-40, the piercing of his hands and feet (Psalms 22:16, John 20:25) and the casting of lots for his garments (Psalms 22:18, Matthew 27:39) are some of the events here described. None of these statements are applicable to David, or to any other known event or person in the history of mankind, except the crucifixion of the Son of God.”

Peter (Acts 2:30-35) preached: ‘David, being a prophet … he foresaw and spoke of … the Christ.’ This basic truth is reiterated again and again in the inspired New Testament.  There are than nine New Testament references which tie the meaning of this psalm irrevocably to the prophecy of our Lord’s crucifixion.  And then, regarding the resurrection, Hebrews 2:12 recounts verses 22-24.

But what of Jesus’ cry in verse one to the Lord.  Why would he speak of God forsaking Him? Burton Coffman’s summary of his thoughts on the subject ring very true:

“Jesus’ quoting the first line of this Psalm during his agony upon the Cross has led to many opinions. It has been supposed that Christ here merely quoted these words from the psalm to call attention to the whole bundle of prophecies in it which were being fulfilled literally at that very time. It is also believed by many that God Himself did indeed, for a little while, withdraw his presence from Christ in order to make it possible for Christ to die. There is much in the sacred Scriptures to commend this view.

Christ is spoken of in Heb. 2:9 as the One, who by the grace of God did indeed, ‘Taste of death for every man.’ Isaiah tells us that, ‘God laid upon him (Jesus) the iniquity of us all’ (Isaiah 53:6). Paul mentioned that God Himself ‘Set forth the Christ to be a propitiation’ (Romans 3:25), or an atonement, for the sins of all men. ‘Christ died for our sins’ (1 Corinthians 15:3); and ‘Him (Christ) who knew no sin, God made to be sin on our behalf; that we might become the righteousness of God in Him’ (2 Corinthians 5:21).

The ultimate consequence of sin is separation from God; and, in Christ’s becoming a substitute for sinful men upon the cross, he not only tasted of death, but also tasted the terrible consequences of sin in that soul-torturing experience of separation from the Creator. It is our understanding of Christ’s plaintive cry, ‘My God, why hast thou forsaken me,’ that Jesus did indeed, momentarily, taste the awful agony of separation from the Father. ‘For a moment in that last agony, the Perfect Man was alone with the sins of the whole world.'”

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

2012 in review for Bob’s boy’s Christianity blog

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Wow, What a year! We started this blog in January of 2012, changing over from a simple email sent daily to a few friends.  We never dreamed it would be so successful.  Don’t get us wrong, we’re not ever going to be one of the most popular spots in the blogging world.  But it just goes to show that simply offering the truth of God’s word with no motive other than the hope of helping others get to heaven really does still work.  we think that’s…well, just awesome.  Our God is an awesome God!

Some of the statistics that surprised us the most were the fact that people in 122 countries have viewed our pages!  And the largest number of viewers for one day was 652 (the post in Acts 12 of Peter’s rescue)!

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 8,300 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 14 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.