Job 23 – Where Is God?

gavelIn spite of the harshness of Eliphaz’s last speech, Job chooses to ignore it. Perhaps he had grown weary of the effort.  That seems to be the case with Bildad and Zophar, as they have become silent.  Instead, Job returns to voicing his wish to lay his case out to God – so sure was he that he is innocent of grievous sin.  Note that Job does not consider himself to be without sin at all.  He simply is convicted that he is innocent enough that his judge (God) would acquit him of whatever sins are imagined against him.

But though he remains steadfast in his belief that he has not departed from the words of the Lord, his fear of God is fierce, and the last few lines are the most poetic of the chapter:

Therefore I am terrified at his presence;
when I consider, I am in dread of him.
God has made my heart faint;
the Almighty has terrified me;
yet I am not silenced because of the darkness,
nor because thick darkness covers my face.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Job 22 – Can a man be profitable to God?

Job_007Chapter 22 begins what is known as the third cycle of speeches in the Book of Job, and this chapter contains Eliphaz’s last attempt at breaking Job’s resolve to claim his innocence.  By now, Zophar has apparently dropped out of the argument, and Bildad will begin another short variance in position during this cycle.  But it is Eliphaz who, here in this chapter, launches the most vicious attack yet.  Interestingly enough, all three men by their attacks on Job, have sincerely believed that they were defending God by doing so.

But Eliphaz, unable to think of any way to “put Job in his place” by any other means, resorts to wildly false accusation using nothing more than an imagination fueled by jealousy and vindictiveness.  It is truly shameful and tasteless, but clearly this locomotive is mercifully expelling its last bit of steam, and all four will sit back and wonder at their own positions throughout the previous debates.  Job’s “friends” will have the most to consider in that respect.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Job 8 – Bildad Speaks: Job Should Repent

Job's Comforters, from the Butts set. Pen and ...

Job’s Comforters, from the Butts set. Pen and black ink, gray wash, and watercolour, over traces of graphite (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is supposed by some that Bildad, as a Shuhite, is a descendant of Shuah, who was a son of Abraham and his wife Keturah (Genesis 25:1-2).  He does not waste any time, but starts right away into a stern rebuke of Job, calling his words a great wind.  He even  makes more than a mere suggestion that his children got what they deserved for their sins!  He tells Job that if he will repent and plead for God’s mercy, he will be restored.   In verses 11-19, he waxes eloquent (Job’s friends all seem to have a gift with words, if not with comfort).

Bildad then tells Job that God will not reject a truly blameless man, but neither will he “take the hand of evildoers.”  If Job will just repent of his sins, God, he says, “will fill your mouth with laughter, and your lips with shouting.”

It is hard to imagine how Job can listen to this from his friend and hold back his anger, but truly his misery is great, and he obviously is trying to consider whether his friend may actually be right, in spite of his own convictions.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.