Jehoshaphat’s Reforms – 2 Chronicles 19

Thomas Seddon - Jerusalem and the Valley of Je...

Thomas Seddon – Jerusalem and the Valley of Jehoshaphat from the Hill of Evil Counsel – Google Art Project (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After Jehoshaphat returned to Jerusalem, he was visited by Jehu, the son of Hanani the seer. Jehu rebuked him for the alliance he had made with Ahab, but said that he had found favor with the Lord because he had “destroyed the Asheroth out of the land,” and also because he had set his heart “to seek God.”

So Jehoshaphat took his responsibility as king and with the service of God personally. He went out among the people “from Beersheba to the hill country of Ephraim,” bringing the people back to the Lord.  He appointed judges throughout Judah, and sternly admonished them to show no partiality or take bribes, but to take care to deal justly with the people.

he then appointed Levites and priests to “give judgment before the Lord, and decide disputed cases, and to do it “in the fear of the Lord, in faithfulness, and with your whole heart.” He set Amariah the chief priest and Zebadiah, the governor of the house of Judah over them to ensure that the law of the Lord was respected, and that justice was done.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

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Ahab Defeated – 2 Chronicles 18

Michelangelo's Asa-Jehoshaphat-Joram.jpg. The ...

Michelangelo’s Asa-Jehoshaphat-Joram.jpg. The man on the left is generally considered to be Jehoshaphat (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jehoshaphat sought to make a marriage alliance with the northern king, Ahab. Ahab wanted Jehoshaphat to  bring his troops and fight against the Syrians at Ramoth-gilead. Jehoshaphat wanted to inquire of the Lord first. So Ahab gathered 400 prophets who predicted success. But one named Micaiah (who Ahab despised) predicted otherwise. He said that his vision saw the Lord with His hose asking how best to entice Ahab to Ramoth-gilead so that he would fall. And it was decided to place a lying spirit in the tongues of all of his prophets.

The relating of this vision angered Ahab, and he had the prophet locked up. So Ahab and Jehoshaphat took their forces to Ramoth-gilead. There, Ahab told Jehoshaphat to remained dressed in his kingly robes, while Ahab would change into a disguise.. Jehoshaphat mysteriously seems gullible in agreeing to this – or did he just have that much faith in God?  The plan worked for Ahab, as the Syrians mistook Jehoshaphat for the northern king.

But Jehoshaphat cried out to the Lord and he was protected. Ahab, however, was defeated and mortally wounded. He had his men take him out of the battle and they left him propped up in his chariot , facing the Syrians. He died that evening at sunset.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

Jehoshaphat! – 2 Chronicles 17

Statues of Josaphat and Ezechias on the Monast...

Statues of Josaphat and Ezechias on the Monastery of El Escorial. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Not many people know much about king Asa’s son Jehoshaphat, except that the name has been used in the phrase “Jumpin’ Jehoshaphat!” There is a lot of speculation about where that phrase came from, and if you query any search engine, you will come across some very entertaining attempts to explain it. None that I have seen seem very likely, though. It is just possible that it became popular because it is phonetically pleasing as a substitute for swearing.

As king, Jehoshaphat worked hard to strengthen Judah against the northern kingdom. He set garrisons and occupied cities all over, including some that his father had captured. Unlike his father, the Lord was with him, the scripture tells us in verse 3, and did not “seek the Baals.”  With God’s help, he grew strong in power and in riches.

verse 7 says that in the third year of his reign, he sent several men, including Obadiah, around to teach the Book of the Law in all the cities of Judah. Verse 10 says that all of the kingdoms around Judah feared them during his reign, and none of them bothered Judah. In fact, verse 11 says that the Philistines, of all people, “brought Jehoshaphat presents and silver for tribute, and the Arabians also brought him 7,700 rams and 7,700 goats.”

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

 

Asa Reigns as King – 2 Chronicles 14

English: Asa of Judah was the third king of th...

English: Asa of Judah was the third king of the Kingdom of Judah and the fifth king of the House of David. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Having just assumed the throne in Chapter 13, Abijah is laid to rest at the start of chapter 14. It is longer, however, than the account of his reign in 1 Kings 15, which does at least note the war. His son, Asa, takes over; and the text tells us that the land had “rest” for ten years. One reason for that was undoubtedly because verse two says that he “did what was good and right in the eyes of the Lord his God.” He took away the foreign altars, got rid of the Asherim, and commanded Judah to keep God’s commandments.

Asa built fortified cities and towers and walls, and also built up a strong army – 300, 000 might men of Judah and 280,000 from Benjamin. There was peace until Zerah the Ethiopian came up against him with a million men and 300 chariots. verse 9 says they came as far as Mareshah, which had been one of Rehoboam’s fortified cities. Asa went out to meet him and prayed to the Lord with both pleading and praise. So, verse 12 says, the Lord defeated Zerah and his forces. Asa and his men pursued those who fled, and none were left alive.

Asa and the men of Judah took much spoil, the text says, from both the Ethiopians and the cities they attacked near Gerar, before returning to Jerusalem.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 


 

 

Brothers Against Brothers – 2 Chronicles 13

Now that Abijah was king of Judah, there came to be a war between him and Jeroboam, the king of Israel. The text give some hint that Jeroboam may have instigated the was, seeking to re-unite the divided kingdom (under his ruler-ship of course. Abijah had troops with him of 400,000 in number, while Jeroboam had 800,000 “mighty warriors.” Abijah stood on Mount Zemaraim and addressed the Israelites.

Map showing the Kingdoms of Israel (blue) and ...

Map showing the Kingdoms of Israel (blue) and Judah (orange), ancient levant borders and ancient cities such as Urmomium and Jerash. The map shows the region in the 9th century BCE. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He reminded them of God’s promise to David, which meant that Jeroboam must not be their king. He also pointed to the golden calves, and the fact that the priest, Levites, and sons of Aaron had been driven out, and that they had unlawfully made priests of people who were not eligible. Their kingdom, their king, and even their service to God was all a lie, and they knew in their hearts it was so.

But while he spoke, Jeroboam sent troops to ambush Abijah and his men from the rear. Verses 16-20 state clearly that God defeated Jeroboam and his troops, and gave them into the hands of Abijah and his men, who took cities from Jeroboam’s kingdom. Verse 17 says that a half million Israelite were killed in this battle. A true blood bath, and Jeroboam never recovered his power against Abijah.  And according to verse 21, Abijah grew mighty.

Abijah’s speech in this chapter was impressive and seemed to foreshadow a great time of Godly leadership for the kingdom of Judah. But alas, we will see that such did not prove to be the case after this victory.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Please check out my Books and my Facebook Author’s Page. You will find the links at this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books“.

 

David Organizes the Sanctuary – (1 Chronicles 24-25)

In these two chapters, David is organizing the priests and the musicians. It might not sound like such a big deal to us, but it was a monumental task. There were many thousands of Levites at this time, and casting lots as he had them to do was the best way to determine the order in which they would serve. The lines came from the sons of Aaron, which would only include Eleazar and Ithamar. Nadab and Abihu had died without any children (Leviticus 10:1-3). It was from the line of Abijah (24:10) that Zechariah, John the baptist’s father, came (Luke 1:5).

 

English: Nadab and Abihu consumed by fire from...

English: Nadab and Abihu consumed by fire from the Lord; illustration from “Figures de la Bible”, illustrated by Gerard Hoet (1648-1733), and others, and published by P. de Hondt in The Hague in 1728; image courtesy Bizzell Bible Collection, University of Oklahoma Libraries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Since the Book of Chronicles is written for the benefit of the returning exiles, it was again important to document the lines carefully in these two chapters. In chapter 25, David and the Levite leaders organized the musicians for the temple under the lines of Asaph, Heman, and Jeduthun. Asaph is credited (at least in the superscripts) with having written Psalm 50 and Psalms 73-83. Heman is probably the same Heman the Ezrahite that is credited in the superscript of Psalm 88. Jeduthun is mentioned in Psalms 39, 62, and 77.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

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1 Samuel 8 – Israel Demands a King

Samuel is getting old, and has appointed his sons Joel and Abijah as judges.  But they are corrupt (verse 3) and the elders come to Samuel and tell him that they want a king.  It was not wrong for them to want a king – as a matter of fact, Moses had told them in Deuteronomy 17:14-15 that they could have one when the time came.  But what they wanted was a military leader, when all along it had been God who fought for them.  It was a rejection of the Lord (verse 7) and God points out to Samuel in verse 8 that it had been so with them ever since he brought them out of Egypt.

So although Samuel didn’t want to do it, the Lord told him to “make them a king.”  But at God’s instruction, Samuel warned them of the “ways of the king” that will reign over them (verses 11-17) – “he will take…”  is emphasized over and over.  Some of this is the common practice of rulers, and necessary – like taxes.  But some as in 14 and 16 were prophetic of abuse, and indeed verse 18 predicts that they will “cry out because of your king”  as slaves.  This type of servitude labor would come to pass for them, as we will see in 1 Kings 5:13-16 and elsewhere.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Robert
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.