Major Prophets (part 2) Book of Isaiah

In chapter 6, Isaiah recalls the time of his call to be a prophet. We know from verse one that this was about 740-739 B.C., as that was most likely the year that King Uzziah (2 Chronicles 26) died. Isaiah lived long enough to write of the death of Sennacherib (Isaiah 37:37-38), the Assyrian king who reigned until 681 B.C.

English: Isaiah; illustration from a Bible car...

English: Isaiah; illustration from a Bible card published by the Providence Lithograph Company (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Traditional secular Jewish and Christian writings state that Jeremiah and Isaiah were the two prophets referred to by the Hebrew writer as having been “sawn in two” (Hebrews 11:37). These writings refer to the persecution under Manasseh, the king of Judah from 687-642 B.C. Other writings in the Book of Isaiah can be dated as well. Chapter 7 was written about 735 B.C.  Chapters 36-38 can be dated about 701, which is the time of the Assyrian invasion.

The book opens with an indictment of the people of Israel, and the declaration that Israel has no excuse for its apostasy (Isaiah 1:1-10). It lists God’s requirements of the people of Israel in order to avert the coming judgment (Isaiah 1:16-20), It also contains the lament over Jerusalem and its coming fate (Isaiah 1:21-23), and a declaration of God’s coming judgment upon the people (Isaiah 1:24-31).

Isaiah is considered to be the most prophetic book of the Bible, and is quoted in the New Testament over 400 times.  The most well-known of his Messianic prophecies are in what is known as the “Suffering Servant” songs. The most beautiful and best understood prophecies that are a source of understanding of the Savior’s purpose as the Messiah are contained in Chapter 53.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
image © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

Advertisement

Isaiah 53 – The Suffering Servant

In chapters 46 -53, the prophet Isaiah introduces four “Servant” songs.  The fourth, the Suffering Servant begun in chapter 52:13-15, continues here in chapter 53.  It is considered one of the most important prophecies of Jesus in the Old Testament.   Twelve verses that foretell the most important event in mankind’s history!  The people are expecting that the Messiah as king will lead them to  military  and political greatness – possibly becoming a great world power.  Isaiah says that when he arrives, they won’t even get it.  The “Arm of the Lord” in verse one refers to God’s power in action.   This verse is referred to in John 12:37-38, and John goes on in 39-41 to quote Isaiah 6:10, elaborating on their blindness, and the hardness of their hearts.  Verses 2-3 show that he will be an outwardly unimpressive man from humble beginnings, rather than a majestically handsome ruler from the elite.  The  “dry ground” of verse two refers to the fallen kingdom of David.

The heart of the song is verses 4-6, as he bore the sins of the world though he was himself innocent – pierced for our transgressions (also see Matthew 8:17).  The event of the crucifixion of Jesus could not be better summed up by these verses.  Notice the words “pierced, crushed, chastisement, wounds.”   Isaiah stresses how much God punished the rejected servant for the sins of all.   Verses 7-8, led like a lamb led to slaughter or a sheep that before its shearers is silent – innocent, yet submissive.

The prophecy of verse 9 (“And they made his grave with the wicked and with a rich man in his death, although he had done no violence, and there was no deceit in his mouth”) is fulfilled in Matthew 27:57-60.  Verses 10-12 make it plain that it was the will of God to crush Him; and the result is not regret, but a sense of triumph and accomplishment.  The crux of verse 10 – “he shall see his offspring” (the new Israel); “he shall prolong his days” (the resurrection); “the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand” (God’s plans are carried out).

Isaiah points ahead to the greatest act of love ever done for man!

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

Isaiah 11 – The Righteous Reign of the Branch

Isaiah 1:1 tells us that this prophet prophesied “in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah”.  His call to ministry came about 740 BC – “in the year that King Uzziah died” (Isaiah 6:1). He lived at least until 681 BC, as he writes of the death of Sennacherib in Isaiah 37:37-38.

English: Isaiah; illustration from a Bible car...

English: Isaiah; illustration from a Bible card published by the Providence Lithograph Company (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isaiah 11 is a very short, but very important chapter in the message of God’s plan for salvation.  Isaiah opens the chapter right away in verse 1 with the promise of the coming of the Messiah.  The reference to  being from the “stump of Jesse” – a greater David is prophesied (Ezekiel 37:24-25), a better king to serve (Hosea 3:5).   Much imagery and evocative language follows, stressing that nothing will stand in the way of God’s plan (see verses 11-16).  Paul refers to these verses, speaking about Jesus in Romans 15:8-13 – saying that “The root of Jesse will come, even he who arises to rule the Gentiles; in him will the Gentiles hope.”

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.