2 Samuel 7 – The Lord’s Covenant with David

If you asked this blogger for an opinion of the most important passages in the Bible,  it would be a tough task.  But the seventh chapter of 2 Samuel would definitely make the short list.  This is where God makes His covenant with David (although the word covenant itself is not used here, see Psalm 89).  Again, this passage is so important, we will find it again in 1 Chronicles 17.

Nathan advises King David

Nathan advises King David (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The chapter begins with David in his majestic home built of cedars, realizing that while God has made his kingdom great, David has not built a temple (a fine house) for God.  At first, the prophet Nathan tells David to go ahead – “for the Lord is with you” (verse 3).  But Nathan was wrong, and the Lord let him know that he should tell David not to do it. we will find out in 1 Chronicles 22:7-9 more reasons why God does not want David to build him a house.  But that is not the important message the Lord wants delivered here.

Instead, the Lord proclaims that He will establish David’s house, raise up his offspring, and establish his kingdom forever (verses 12-16 – compare to the Hebrew writer’s words about Jesus in  Hebrews 1:1-5). The comparison there seems similar to the explanation of the covenant with Abraham and his offspring that we find in Galatians 3:11-16 (especially verse 16), although Solomon is clearly the intended for the “short-term” kingdom.  But the kingdom that will last forever will be of Jesus the Christ (Acts 2:25-34).

Notice the prayer from David in verses 18-29 – full of intimate feelings of humility, thanksgiving, honor and respect (David uses the phrase “O Lord God” eight times).  Truly one of the great prayers of the Bible, and fitting to the momentous news he has received from God.  David indicates that he understands the monumental result of this news, but is filled with wonder, that God has chosen him to do his this great thing through.

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

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2 Samuel 6 – The Ark Brought to Jerusalem

The story of the ark being brought to Jerusalem is told here, and the first attempt does not go well.  The ark was one of the “holy things,” with which they communed with the Lord – but though the Levite priests.  The detail given by the Lord for its construction was exquisite (Exodus 25:10-22, and Exodus 37:1-9).  The Koathites were to carry it – by poles through the rings.  Even they could not touch it, or they would die (Numbers 4:4-15).  None but the priests themselves could touch the holy things, as God had set the Levites apart (consecrated) for himself.

The Chastisement of Uzzah

The Chastisement of Uzzah (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

But they set out to bring it to Jerusalem on a cart, much as the manner in which the Philistines returned it in 1 Samuel 6:7.  The oxen stumbled, and Uzzah reached out to take hold of it (the right thing to do, one might think). But as we have learned, when God says He will do something, He always does it.  God keeps ALL of His promises!  David and those transporting the Ark showed no respect for the Lord, and Uzzah was now dead because of his sin.

Three months pass after this incident (verse 11) before David again transports it.  This second attempt is mentioned briefly here, but in more detail in 1 Chronicles 15, as this story is told there again. As our reading has shown before, when God says something more than once, we should pay attention!  This time, the Levites carry it to Jerusalem properly.

Michal’s disdain and David’s rejection of her afterward is important to us because she will not bear him a child – Saul’s line will not be extended through the house of David.  Contrary to the picture some have painted, David was not dancing naked, but wearing a linen ephod – a simple garment as the priests wore (verse 14, and 1 Chronicles 15:27).  He had taken off his kingly robes to honor the Lord (verse 21).

When Jesus laid down His life for us and the temple curtain was torn (Matthew 27:51), Jesus became like our “ark”, just as He is our Priest, through which we can approach the Father (Hebrews 5:1-10).  Do we honor and respect this most holy and precious son of our Lord, whose very name is even used today by many to casually swear?

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.

2 Samuel 5 – David Anointed King of Israel

Ophel (City of David), Jerusalem, Israel. The ...

Ophel (City of David), Jerusalem, Israel. The Kidron Valley and Mount of Olives are in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The kingdom has become unified, and David has now become king of all Israel, just as God intended.  Now he wants Jerusalem, but the Jebusites are in the way, and they do not think David and his army are a threat (verse 6).  But his army is victorious, 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 tell us that it was this battle that resulted in Joab becoming his commander.  David took the stronghold at Zion, and it became the City of David.

Then David went up against the Philistines, whom he heard were after him (verse 20).  He defeated them at Baal-perazim (verse 20), and they left their idols there.  This is a bit ironic, as it was the Philistines who had captured the ark of the covenant in 1 Samuel 4:1-11.  It is in  1 Chronicles 14:12 that we learn that David had these idols burned.

Verse 11 tells us that “Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house.”  It is unsure whether this is the same king Hiram of Tyre that in 1 Kings 5:1–18 provided David’s son, Solomon with the cedars to build the temple – or maybe his son.  But David and his kingdom have become greater and greater (verse 10).

Read or listen to audio of ESV version of this selection from this link.

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  For questions and help, please see the “FAQ” and “Summaries” pages there.