Gatekeepers and Treasurers – 1 Chronicles 26

Among the Levites, the gatekeepers had the responsibility first and foremost of protecting the sanctuary from unlawful or unauthorized entry and defilement from such practices as idolatry. Their duties also included taking care of the temple treasuries and dedicated gifts, as well as maintenance of the building (as detailed in 1 Chronicles 9:22-32). It was likely this group that Hezekiah assembled to cleanse the temple in 2 Chronicles 29:3-11.

Ark of the Covenant.

Ark of the Covenant.

Among the gatekeepers were the families of Meshelemiah, Hoash, and Obed-edom. This is surely the same Obed-edom whose house the ark was to after the failed first attempt. It had remained there for three months (1 Chronicles 13:13-14, 2 Samuel 6:10-12).  This is significant in that Obed-edom was a Gittite (a resident of Gath). Was he a Gittite by birth geographically, but genealogically an Israelite? The Bible is silent about his participation, but we do know that the passages just cited say that God blessed his household and all that he had when the ark was left in his care. Where the Lord is concerned, that is enough.

The treasurers were from the sons of Gershom, Ladan, and other Kohathites. There were two separate treasuries that were kept near the gates. One contained the offerings and tithes of the people, while the other contained the spoils taken in battle and certain other dedicated gifts, such as  those dedicated by Samuel, Saul, David, and his commanders. The Izharites and Hebronites were appointed to oversee the territories of the Reubenites, Gadites, Manassites, and other areas west of the Jordan.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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The Prodigal Son, Part 2 – (Luke 15)

The younger son traveled back home to ask his father to take him in and let him work as one of his servants. But his father saw him coming from a long way off, and he ran to meet him. Though his father embraces him, he has come with a contrite heart and acknowledges his guilt. But his father had his servants to clothe him in the best manner he could, and he arranged for a feast to celebrate the return of the son, who for all practical purposes had been dead. But now the lost one had been found.

It is just so with God. There is no sin that we can do that, with a repentant heart, God will not eagerly forgive us. As His children, He joyfully accepts us back, no matter what. And Jesus has told us twice in this chapter how much joy there is in heaven when one sinner repents.

Return of the prodigal son

Return of the prodigal son

But the older son hears the celebration, and does not come to His father, but instead speaks to a servant to find out what is going on. What does that say about his relationship with his father, especially when he, in his anger, refused to go in? Though his father comes out and “entreats him,” he still will not relent, and he makes his displeasure, disdain, and even jealousy known to his father. He degenerates his younger brother for his sins, and cannot understand why the father is treating him so well. His father wants the elder son to join them, but he also wants him to understand that it is most appropriate to be joyous and to celebrate the return of one who was lost to him.

When the chapter started, back in verse 2, the Pharisees and scribes grumbled, saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them” because Jesus was consorting with known sinners. Jesus had explained in two previous parables how much joy God has for the lost returning to him. But now He is describing the elder brother with the same attitude that the Pharisees had. They felt that they were entitled to a higher degree of regard because they had given years of service to keeping God’s law, as passed down through Moses (albeit, with much of their own agenda thrown into the mix).

God had entreated them to come in by sending his Son, but they had thus far rejected the idea in their anger and disdain for the sinners Jesus receives. The same would be true, even of other Jews, when Gentiles were openly received. The parable ended with the elder son still not coming in. Would he finally come in? The question for those Pharisees, if they heard and understood, was whether they would put away their foolish anger and pride, and come into God’s kingdom as well.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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The Prodigal Son, Part 1 – (Luke 15)

Just about everyone has heard of the “parable of the prodigal son.” And many of us have heard several different sermons preached about that parable. There seems to be something different to take away from it from many perspectives. Today, we will look at the story from the viewpoint of what happened to the younger son.

The prodigal son departs

The prodigal son departs

 

It begins with the younger of two sons asking for his father to give him his share of the inheritance that he was to receive. So the father, though he had no requirement to do so, divided their property then and gave him his share. The older son, according to custom, would receive a double portion.

The younger one took his belongings, and traveled to a far off country; and he wasted his inheritance in what the scripture terms “reckless living.” After a famine occurred in the country, he had to go to work feeding pigs; and his situation became so desperate that even the pods that he was feeding the pigs began to look good to him. These pods were from the carob tree. It is only the husks that were actually edible. The seeds inside are too hard to be edible. The husks can be ground into a type of flour that has a quality like chocolate, and in fact, carob is used by many today as a substitute for chocolate. But they were usually only eaten by the poor when times were most desperate – or for feeding pigs, of course.

carob_pods_270314This younger son at this point realized how much better off he would be back at his father’s home – even by offering himself as a servant, rather than a family member. He resolved to go back and beg his father to allow him to come back under just those conditions; and he even rehearsed how he would ask for this. He realized that his circumstances were entirely his fault, and that his father had no obligation even to give him a place to stay (much less feed him) as a servant.

The younger son realized something that may not occur to us when we stray. As sinners, if we have no repentance in our hearts and our lives, God has no obligation to even hear our prayers. He may choose to do so. But he has made no promise in that respect. What a dreadful situation to be separated from God, and unable to present our petitions to Him because of the condition of our hearts. But it is evident that the results of his sin have caused a change in his heart.

Next, we’ll look a little closer at what happened when he goes to his father with this change of heart, and what that means to the elder brother.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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His Sheep – (Luke 15)

sheep_270314All through the Bible, and especially in the New Testament, the analogy is made to people as sheep. Jesus told His disciples that He is the “Good Shepeherd” (John 10:1-21). He told Peter to “feed my sheep” (John 21:17). Paul charged the elders of the church at Ephesus to pay attention to the flock and to the wolves that would come to devour them (Acts 20:28-31). And Peter charged the elders to “shepherd the flock among you” (1 Peter 5:1-5). And of course, everyone has at least heard of the 23rd Psalm.

shepherd_270314The Israelites had long been a pastoral people. Sheep could be bred in large numbers, and provided meat, milk, and wool, making them an excellent choice for such people to raise. But sheep are not generally known for their intelligence. For example, a sheep will continue to graze and if allowed to, will wander far away from the herd without realizing it is getting lost.

Before the poor animal knows what has happened, it can fall prey to predators because of the lack of numbers or a shepherd to protect it. Or it may simply not be able to find its way, and wander aimlessly. The sheep and their shepherd become very close, and the sheep are wholly dependent on him. There is a bond that forms, and the sheep will absolutely respond to the mere voice of the shepherd because it trusts him.

It is this type of care for God’s people that Jesus assumed when he became flesh. And it is the same care that He expected His apostles to assume and to establish in His church. As His children, we are dependent on Him for our salvation. But it is easy for us to lose our way, and to fall prey to those who wish to harm His church. Those who assume such a role in His church should be respected and always encouraged by the rest of us. It is an awesome responsibility to care for His sheep.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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Into the Streets and Lanes – (Luke 15)

Jesus continued to draw large crowds as His ministry continued. Now more than ever before, it seems the tax collectors and sinners drew nearer to Him to hear what He had to say. This of course raised the hackles on the Pharisees, who grumbled about such a scandalous thing – a supposed man of God consorting openly with those who were known to be living contrary to God’s word.

The Lost Drachma

The Lost Drachma (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jesus acknowledged their sentiment toward the subject, but did not validate it. Instead he offers the parables of the lost sheep and of the lost coin. He asks if any of them who had 100 sheep would not leave the 99 in search of one that was lost. And he spoke of the joy the woman would have over finding the lost coin.  He tells them that there is more joy in heaven over one sinner repenting than for 99 righteous people who “need no repentance.”

It was no accident that everywhere Jesus went, He attracted such people because that was what He intended to do. In Matthew 18:14, Jesus made it clear, speaking of children , that “it is not the will of my Father who is in heaven that one of these little ones should perish.” But he said it in the context of the parable of the lost sheep in that passage. In the last chapter, Jesus told the parable of the man who gave the great banquet, and eventually sent his servant out “into the streets and the lanes,” bringing those that others have excluded to the banquet (Luke 14:21).

Jesus was doing just that. The tax collectors and the sinners that the Pharisees disdained here are the people who have been excluded in their own way. God wanted Jesus to find and save those people, and bring them to the feast. We do well to remember that Jesus said many times that he had “not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance” (Luke 5:32). These are people that we too are supposed to love enough to want to help them to be saved.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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The Great Commitment

 

Creator of Abor Day, Julius Sterling Morton in...

Creator of Abor Day, Julius Sterling Morton in 1858. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the last two verses of Luke chapter 14, Jesus talks about salt that has lost its flavor. Numerous explanations have been given us for how salt can lose its flavor, and some sound pretty close to accurate, while others do not (IMHO). So I am going to offer my own. Julius Sterling Morton was a philanthropist and early settler of Nebraska. Deciding that it was much too flat, he began the business of planting enormous amounts of trees there. He eventually created a 400 acre arboretum, which has grown into a 1700 acre wonder of living trees, bushes, etc. Grover Cleveland made him the 3rd U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, and a notable addition to his accomplishments was the founding of Arbor Day.

In 1911, one of his sons, Joy Morton, turned the business he had bought into the incorporated Morton Salt Company. The slogan “when it rains, it pours” was adapted from an old proverb. The little girl holding the umbrella in the rain was created with the slogan. The company had begun adding magnesium chloride to prevent caking when it became humid. It worked very well, but in a shaker you will still sometimes see that people have put a few grains of rice in to absorb moisture and prevent clumping, as it is out of the box and it sits for a long time.

The salt we buy these days with that little girl and the umbrella (or a more generic brand, if you prefer) can be bought for about 50 cents a box today. It is refined salt, which removes many natural minerals, and various companies add different chemicals for various reasons. But the salt that was around in Jesus’ day was unrefined salt – just the way God made it. You can buy unrefined salt today, but the same amount of unrefined salt as what you get in that round box will set you back anywhere from $6 -$15. But many of us believe it is much healthier for you.

Salt farmers harvesting salt, Pak Thale, Ban L...

Salt farmers harvesting salt, Pak Thale, Ban Laem, Phetchaburi, Thailand (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This unrefined salt contains many minerals (some would call “impurities,” which is a bogus assessment). In those times, if the salt became moist and started to dissolve over a long period of time, it would eventually become bland in taste, as the ratio of sodium chloride to mineral content began to become smaller.

So what has that to do with us? The context in which Jesus was talking about this was all about “counting the cost” of what it takes before becoming a Christian. And in these last two verses, he said “Salt is good, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is of no use either for the soil or for the manure pile. It is thrown away.”

When we first become Christians – assuming we are truly committed – we are full of zeal and enthusiasm. But as time goes by and the cares of this life begin taking their toll, some of that zeal and enthusiasm can easily be lost. It is easy for us to begin the race and then slow down over time – or even veer off the path. If we are not careful, we can lose our way, and our faith can become in vain – useless to anyone who might otherwise be positively influenced by our example.

The best way to keep the “moisture” of life’s troubles and temptations from leaching away our “saltiness” is by keeping the light of God’s word in our lives and nurturing our relationships and love with other Christians. We need a daily dose of reading God’s word, and fellowship that not only gives us encouragement, but also accountability.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.

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David Organizes the Sanctuary – (1 Chronicles 24-25)

In these two chapters, David is organizing the priests and the musicians. It might not sound like such a big deal to us, but it was a monumental task. There were many thousands of Levites at this time, and casting lots as he had them to do was the best way to determine the order in which they would serve. The lines came from the sons of Aaron, which would only include Eleazar and Ithamar. Nadab and Abihu had died without any children (Leviticus 10:1-3). It was from the line of Abijah (24:10) that Zechariah, John the baptist’s father, came (Luke 1:5).

 

English: Nadab and Abihu consumed by fire from...

English: Nadab and Abihu consumed by fire from the Lord; illustration from “Figures de la Bible”, illustrated by Gerard Hoet (1648-1733), and others, and published by P. de Hondt in The Hague in 1728; image courtesy Bizzell Bible Collection, University of Oklahoma Libraries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Since the Book of Chronicles is written for the benefit of the returning exiles, it was again important to document the lines carefully in these two chapters. In chapter 25, David and the Levite leaders organized the musicians for the temple under the lines of Asaph, Heman, and Jeduthun. Asaph is credited (at least in the superscripts) with having written Psalm 50 and Psalms 73-83. Heman is probably the same Heman the Ezrahite that is credited in the superscript of Psalm 88. Jeduthun is mentioned in Psalms 39, 62, and 77.

 

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

 

/Bob’s boy

 

___________________

 

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

 

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

 

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Bearing One’s Cross – (Luke 14)

Dante's Vision of Rachel and Leah Dante Gabrie...

Dante’s Vision of Rachel and Leah Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1899 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verse 25, Jesus is no longer at the house of the Pharisee, and “great crowds” were with Him. Then he turned to them and said “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple.” Now obviously, Jesus is not teaching hate for our loved ones, and we all know that He is saying that our love for Him must take priority over everything and everyone else. So why not just say it that way? It was simply the way that the sentiment was expressed among the Jews of those and earlier times. It was used, for example, with relation to Jacob’s feelings for Leah and Rachel (Genesis 29:30-31),

And then Jesus says “whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple.” We sometimes hear others speak of some difficulty they have in their lives and refer to it as “the cross I bear.” But consider the people who Jesus was talking to here. For them, crucifixion was not simply some bizarre and barbaric practice one reads about in a book of history. It was the normal method of execution used in that day, and the punishment did not come after years and years of appeals and waiting. It came swiftly, and often.

English: Engraving of Jesus Christ on Golgotha.

English: Engraving of Jesus Christ on Golgotha. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The language would have been plain to His disciples. He was telling them that truly being committed as a disciple of Christ could result in one’s death for that commitment. He gives them the example of someone who would begin building a tower. Such an undertaking would not be so easy as building house, for example. The time it took would be considerable, and the labor would be intensive. Most likely, one would have to enlist the help of many others in order to complete it. And the amount of materials required would be costly, possibly requiring a great deal of it to be transported from far away.

The second example he gave was of a king, preparing an army to do battle with another army. Careful consideration would have to be made about the probabilities of the outcome, the commitment required to prevail, etc. Both examples demonstrate the careful consideration that would have to be given before making such commitments – counting the costs beforehand. Many do not realize that this is the kind of commitment Jesus expects even today from those who would be His disciples.

It is not a decision to take so lightly that it becomes simply a Sunday morning ritual. Being a Christian must mean making a genuine and profound change in one’s entire life. The Lord expects no less than that. Why would we expect that years after first making that commitment it would be acceptable to Him for us to simply “go through the motions” once a week? It it takes much work and focus to “run with endurance the race that is set before us.” (Hebrews 12:1).

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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The Great Banquet – (Luke 14)

Verses 12-24 contain the “Parable of the Great Banquet.” Jesus begins addressing the man who invited him. He tells him that whenever he gives a dinner or a banquet, he should not invite his friends, family, or rich neighbors, but instead he should invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind. The former group of people will be likely to return his graciousness by inviting him to a feast of their own, whereas the latter will be unable to do so.

feasting_200314But He tells the man that he will blessed because he will be repaid at the “resurrection of the just.” Unlike the Sadducees, the Pharisees believed in the resurrection of the dead (Acts 23:8), so the point was well taken.  The more often we read God’s word, the clearer it becomes how important it is to God that we treat very well those who are poor or physically disadvantaged. God makes the point over and over again through the prophets in the Old Testament; and Jesus does so time and again by His words and His actions.  Generosity and kindness to others in those situations truly matters.

But Jesus is not finished with the lesson. When one of those at table commented “blessed is everyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God,” Jesus began the parable. A man planned a “great banquet,” and had invited a great many people. When the time came for it to be held, he sent his servant around to remind everyone that the time had arrived. But he received one excuse after another from people who were too busy with the affairs of this life to attend. So the man became angry, and instead he filled his house with the poor, the crippled, the blind, and finally with anyone his servant met that would come. And the man declared that none of those who had originally been invited would be allowed to attend, should they change their mind.

It is not hard to figure out the meaning of the parable. The man giving the banquet represents God and the banquet represents the kingdom. Those invited first were God’s chosen people, and their excuses were the rejection of the Christ. And of course, the last group brought in represents the Gentiles – all who will come.

Did any of those who were “reclining at table” really understand this? Perhaps some did. It took Peter and the other apostles a while to truly get it (Acts 10, Acts 15:6-11), but God made sure that they did.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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The Chief Seats – (Luke 14)

Jesus told another parable beginning in verse while at the dinner at the Pharisee’s house. The scripture says that this parable of the wedding feast was prompted by the way He saw that the guests had chosen the “places of honor.” Some versions call these seats “the chief seats,” while others call them simply the “best seats.” We cannot be sure which these were, but a good assumption might be that the very best seats would be those closest to the host.

What Jesus makes the analogy to is being invited to a wedding feast and choosing one of those places of honor, only to get “bumped down” to a more lowly seat when someone “more distinguished” shows up. It would be better to choose the lowly seats, and then the host might move you to a better seat, bringing you honor instead of embarrassment. This is certainly sound advice, and would definitely make you seem less presumptuous and more polite anyway.

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Matthew 25:14-30 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

But beyond the practical advice for everyday life that this parable involves, it resounds with the way that Jesus has taught all along. He tells them that “everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” He taught this at the sermon on the mount. And he drives this point home to His apostles (Matthew 19:30, Matthew 20:16 , Luke 13:30). The teaching was very relevant for these Pharisees, many of whom had a high opinion of their own importance.

And of course, its relevance to us today is the same as in the passages just mentioned. It is the same mindset that is commanded to us in Matthew 6:3-4, when Jesus tells us to do good for others in secret, so that the right hand doesn’t know what the left is doing. Christians should not be about the business of making themselves feel important. Humbleness and humility are valued by God, and we will be rewarded by Him for the good that we do. That is enough.

(This year’s reading plan for Luke, Acts, and 1 and 2 Chronicles averages just 15 verses per day – 5 days per week!)
Schedule for this week
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from Luke here
Read or listen to audio of today’s selection from 1 Chronicles here

/Bob’s boy
___________________
some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please note: I did not design the reading plan that I am following in my blog.  All of my comments in this blog, however, are solely my responsibility.  When reading ANY commentary, you should ALWAYS refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word. Reading schedules, as well as a link to the site where you can get the reading plan that I’m currently following for yourself can be found on the “Bible Reading Schedules” page of my website at http://graceofourlord.com.  

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