Peter and John in Solomon’s Portico – Acts 3

Dormition of the Theotokos Church in Matejče, ...

Dormition of the Theotokos Church in Matejče, Macedonia (1348-1352), The Cycle of the Acts of the Apostles, St. Peter Preaching in Jerusalem (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Peter and John, in chapter 3, heal a man who was lame from birth. In Solomon’s Portico (or porch), the two had created quite a stir. Solomon’s Portico, according to Josephus was a part of the original temple surroundings that still remained from Solomon’s time. It was a large colonnade with double columns that ran along the eastern wall in the Court of the Gentiles. Jesus taught there at the Feast of Dedication in the winter (John 10:22-23).

The astonished crowd was growing, and Peter of course, used the opportunity to preach to them. He began by letting them know that it was not by their power that the man had been healed, but by that of Jesus. He used the opportunity to tell that they had denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you” (Barabas). He then said that they “killed the author of life.” This is a significant statement by Peter, in that it demonstrates that Jesus came to earth fully Lord and God, having been from the beginning, just as John’s gospel states.

He tells them that he and the others are witnesses that God raised Him from the dead, and that it was by faith in Him that this man was healed. Peter would not be oblivious to the fact that among the listeners would be Pharisees and their sympathizers. It was a message that was intended for them to hear – not for the purpose of confrontation, but for the opportunity for salvation.

Peter continues preaching in the Portico, telling his listeners that they must repent and turn back from their wickedness. He tells them that Jesus must now be received by heaven until it is time for Him to return. there He will remain, he says, “until the time for restoring all the things about which God spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets long ago.” It is the restoring of what God had proclaimed was very good in the beginning — until sin entered the world.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Acts 3, Acts 4, Acts 5, Acts 6, Acts 7

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Day of Pentecost – Acts 1-2

Luke begins the book of The Acts of the Apostles by addressing Theophilus again. He summarizes what he had told him in “the first book” — the Gospel of Luke, emphasizing the charge Jesus had given to the apostles after his resurrection, and the fact that He spent 40 days speaking with them about the kingdom of God. He also made a point to say that Jesus provided “many proofs” during that time. It was an important point, and one that Paul also stressed at times (1 Corinthians 15:5-7). Peter also said plainly that they were “eyewitnesses of His majesty” (2 Peter 1:16).

English: The Pentecost. From the Acts of the A...

English: The Pentecost. From the Acts of the Apostles printed in , Georgia, in 1709 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He further told Theophilus that Jesus had ordered them not to leave Jerusalem, but to wait for the promise of the Father, “which you heard from me.” It was in Luke 24:49 that Jesus said “I am sending the promise of my Father upon you. But stay in the city until you ware clothed with power from on high.” Here, he says “John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.” It is that baptism which will ensure that Jesus’ apostles have all of the knowledge they need to grow the Lord’s church.

On the day of Pentecost, the apostles were filled with the Holy Spirit, and began speaking in “tongues” – not gibberish, but languages that people who spoke such would understand. Then Peter preached the first Gospel sermon, telling them who Jesus was, and how they were guilty in His death.

Verse 37 says that when they heard this they were “cut to the heart.” How many of them, one might wonder, had been among the frenzied crowd that was calling out “Crucify Him” just about 50 days earlier? So they asked Peter and the other eleven apostles what they should do. Peter’s answer in Acts 2:38 may be the most important verse in the this whole book:

Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.

But Peter made certain that they knew that this was not just a “good idea,” considering what had been done to the Lord. It was not something that just a few of them — the ones who may have been among that mob mentioned above. And it was not just a passing ritual to be done for now, but meaning no urgency for times to come. Quite the contrary, Peter’s next words sealed it as the promise of the path to salvation for all to come, as he said in verse 39:

For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.

About three thousand of them were baptized then, as the church immediately took hold. Now, this number has brought about some criticism from skeptics, of course, saying that 12 men could not have baptized so many. But of course, Jesus’ other disciples would have been baptized already, and would be there to help. God’s will would be done. I suppose that as a number of these were baptized, several of them joined in completing the task with those who remained, as well.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 22, Luke 23, Luke 24, Acts 1, Acts 2

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Crucifixion and Resurrection – Luke 23-24

Jesus was taken away to be crucified, and there were two criminals taken with him to be put to death, fulfilling Isaiah 53:12, which said he would be numbered with transgressors. Luke says that they came to a place known as the skull. It is also known as Golgatha which comes from an Aramaic word for skull. There, they crucified Him and the criminals with one on each side of Him. Jesus said “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus...

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus, Braga, Portugal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One prisoner began to mock as well, but the other rebuked him and asked Jesus to remember him when He came into His kingdom. Jesus told him that this day he would be with Him in paradise (verse 43). Jesus, as we saw in other passages, did have the authority to forgive sins, and He exercised it there.

Joseph of Arimathea was a member of the Sanhedrin council who had not consented to their decision to railroad the Lord. Luke says that he was a good and righteous man, and was looking for the kingdom. He got custody of the body of Jesus from Pilate, and wrapped it in a linen shroud. Then he placed it in a tomb that was cut in stone and had never been used for burial. The women prepared ointment and spices. And then they rested on the Sabbath rested as commanded.

The day that Jesus rose, two of His disciples were traveling to the village of Emmaus. One was named Cleopas, but we do not know the name of the other. We are told in verse 16 that “their eyes were kept from recognizing him” when Jesus drew near. When He asks them about the conversation they are having, the two men proceed to tell him about Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus gave them a mild rebuke for being slow to believe what the prophets had spoken. He then interpreted Scriptures from Moses and the prophets concerning the Christ. The revelation of Himself to these two disciples would appear to serve one purpose – that of a proper eyewitness account.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 22, Luke 23, Luke 24, Acts 1, Acts 2

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Lord’s Supper and the Arrest of Jesus – Luke 22

In Luke 22, the Feast of the Passover is approaching, and Jesus sends Peter and John in to town to find a room. He told them exactly in detail what they would find when they got there, and it is exactly what they found. Judas, meanwhile, had already made arrangements with the chief priests and officers as to how he would betray Jesus.

English: "The Judas Kiss", (Mark 14:...

English: “The Judas Kiss”, (Mark 14:45) by Gustave Doré. Judas kisses Jesus in order to betray him to the guards. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 14-23, Jesus instituted the Lord’s supper, and also revealed that one of them would betray him. In Luke’s account, their concern and inquiry as to which one of them would be the worst (in that respect) was followed quickly by an argument between them as to which one of them was the greatest. They still just didn’t get it, and Jesus told them that the least would be the greatest. Being in the kingdom was not about being lifted up before men. It was (and still is) all out serving others.

This long chapter (66 verses) has a lot of history in it. Jesus informs Peter of his impending denial, and then he goes to the mount of Olives to pray. Next comes his betrayal by Judas and his arrest. After Peter’s denial, he is mocked and beaten, and then he was brought before the council. He gives them very little in their questioning, saying “You say that I am” when asked if he was the Son of God. That was enough for them. They would take him to Pilate to do their dirty work.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 22, Luke 23, Luke 24, Acts 1, Acts 2

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Destruction of Jerusalem Foretold Luke 20-21

In Luke 20, the chief priests and scribes challenge Jesus’ authority in verses 1-8. Then in verses 9-18, he tells the parable of the wicked tenants, citing Psalm 118:22 in verse 17: “The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone.” It is obviously about the rejection of the Son of God by the Jewish leaders, and that perception is not lost on those present. Verse 19 says that they “sought to lay hands on him that very hour.”

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus...

English: Statue of Pontius Pilate in Bom Jesus, Braga, Portugal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In verses 19-26, they try to trap him into saying that they should not pay taxes to Caesar, so they could use that against him. He, of course, said exactly the opposite, noting whose face was on their coins. Yet they would later lie to Pilate, making the accusation that he really did say that.

Luke 21 has the story of the widow who gave all that she had at the offering box, saying that she had done more than any of those who had given larger amounts. He then begins telling them in great detail in most of the remainder of the chapter about the persecution, war and famine that awaited them because of him, along with the ultimate destruction of Jerusalem. He gives them many signs, so the Christians would know what to look for. it is because of this that many of them escaped and survived to continue to spread the gospel.

 

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

The Unrighteous Judge – Luke 18-19

Jesus tells the story of the unrighteous judge in chapter 18. He neither “feared God nor respected man.” A widow persistently came to him seeking justice for some wrong against her.  The judge finally relented because he realized the widow would not leave him alone until he did something.

English: Jesus entering Jerusalem on a donkey

English: Jesus entering Jerusalem on a donkey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jesus was not making the point that God will finally answer our prayers just because He finally gets weary of hearing our constant whining. The point he was making was that prayer is important, and that God does indeed listen to our prayers. Perhaps we will on some occasions “cry out” to Him day and night. But He will give justice to us speedily. Now “speedily” in God’s terms may not be exactly the time frame we have in mind. There are many more to consider than just us, and sometimes we have trials to test us and make us stronger. But justice will come.

Chapter 19 contains Luke’s account of the triumphal entry into Jerusalem. It is a momentous occasion, and it is lauded by the people as it should have been. Most of them, however, were expecting a different sort of savior, and were giving Him praise in expectation of a political upheaval that would not take place. No doubt this knowledge added to His sadness, as He once again weeps for Jerusalem in verses 41-44.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

About Rebuke – Luke 17

Jesus speaks in Luke 17 about the temptations to sin. In verses 1-4, he talks about this, and about forgiveness, and about rebuking one’s brother when he sins. This is another passage that underscores the misinterpretation and misapplication of the passages that say “judge not, lest ye be judged.”

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 16:19-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many people who know very little about the bible, know those passages very well. They are the “get out of jail free” cards for sin. “You can’t judge me!” We certainly cannot judge others. And we certainly cannot put ourselves above others. But we must be able to know when others are doing wrong — when they have gone against God’s word. If not, how can we rebuke our brother?

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 17, Luke 18, Luke 19, Luke 20, Luke 21

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Faithful In a Very Little – Luke 16

In verses 1-10 of Luke chapter 16, Jesus tells the story of the “dishonest manager.” He said in verses 10-11:

One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches?

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 16:19-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is just one of many examples in which God’s word tells us that He really does “sweat the small stuff.” No act of kindness or unkindness is too small. No act of mercy or being unmerciful is too incidental. No act of honesty or dishonesty goes unnoticed by the Lord. Integrity is of no small measure in His eyes.

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 12, Luke 13, Luke 14, Luke 15, Luke 16

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Being His Disciple – Luke 14-15

Jesus again talks about what it takes to be one of His disciples in Luke 14. In verses 26-33, He tells them that a disciple must hate his own family — and even his own life. And he finishes up by saying that the disciple must renounce all that he has. Of course we know that Jesus does not want us to hate anyone. It is an expression often used in the bible when talking about loving someone or something more than another, and that is the point.

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 14:16-24 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By the same token, we do not have to give away everything we own. But those people and those things mean little — must mean little — to us in the grand scheme of things. Our devotion to the Lord is what will carry us to the prize at the end.

Much is made by the Pharisees, in chapter 15 and elsewhere, about Jesus associating with sinners and those that the pious do not approve of. Those are naturally the very people Jesus came to associate with, as He said time and again. How often do we try to alienate ourselves from those sorts of people? Certainly, we do not want to put ourselves in a position to be tempted to imitate ungodly behavior. But we have to be “in the world.” We cannot do that if we separate ourselves entirely.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 12, Luke 13, Luke 14, Luke 15, Luke 16

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.

 

 

 

 

Rich Toward God – Luke 12-13

One of the parables Jesus tells in chapter 12 is that of the rich man who saw how much he had and all he could think of was making room for even more. For some, no matter how much they have, it is never enough. Was Jesus speaking of this to show how wrong it is to be wealthy? Of course not, but his heart belonged to his wealth. there was no mention of taking the excess and helping those in need. No mention of how devoted he was to serving the Lord. He finished the story in verse 21, saying “So is the one who lays up treasure for himself AND is not rich toward God.” God was not in the man’s heart. Neither was anyone else.

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating...

English: An etching by Jan Luyken illustrating Luke 12:12-21 in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton, England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In chapter 13, Jesus is getting close to his last days in Jerusalem, and verses 31-35 contain his tearful lament for the price she would pay for her rejection of the savior. Just before his lament, verse 31 states that some Pharisees came to warn Him to leave because Herod wants to kill Him. It is one of many illustrations that there were Pharisees (and Sadducees) that were not against Him. Many, in fact. would be converted.

 

/Bob’s boy

Bible Reading Schedule for this month
Click links below to read or listen to audio of one of this week’s chapters in Colossians and Luke

Luke 12, Luke 13, Luke 14, Luke 15, Luke 16

___________________

some images © V. Gilbert & Arlisle F. Beers

Please visit this site’s menu item “The Author’s Books” for info on the author’s books, website, and Facebook page.

All of my comments in this blog are solely my responsibility. When reading any commentary, you should always refer first to the scripture, which is God’s unchanging and unfailing word.